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Predicting Cancer Prognosis

Date:
August 28, 2009
Source:
American Journal of Pathology
Summary:
Researchers have developed a novel methodology to extract microRNAs from cancer tissues. They optimized a new protocol for extracting miRNAs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

Researchers led by Dr. Soheil Dadras at the Stanford University Medical Center have developed a novel methodology to extract microRNAs from cancer tissues. The related report by Ma et al. appears in the September 2009 issue of the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

Cancer tissues from patients are often stored by a method that involves formalin fixation and paraffin embedding to retain morphological definition for identification; however, this method frequently prevents further molecular analysis of the tissue because of mRNA degradation. Even so, these tissues contain high numbers of microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short enough (~22 nucleotides) to not be broken down during the fixation process.

In this study, Dr. Dadras and colleagues optimized a new protocol for extracting miRNAs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Using their new procedure, they identified 17 new and 53 known miRNAs from normal skin, melanoma, and sentinel lymph nodes. These miRNAs were well-preserved in a 10-year-old specimen. This new protocol, therefore, will allow for the identification of novel miRNAs that may differ in cancerous and healthy tissue, even from long-preserved tissue, leading to better predictions of disease prognosis and treatment response.

Ma et al suggest that their "cloning strategy has the advantage of not only discovering novel and known miRNA sequence identity but also providing an estimate of relative expression level. … [This methodology may provide] a more robust strategy to obtain an accurate expression profile for novel and/or previously characterized small RNAs from clinically defined [formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded] tumor specimens, thereby facilitating the discovery of 'oncomirs' as biomarkers."

This work was supported in part by 2007 Dermatology Foundation Dermatopathology Research Grant and the department of Pathology research funds at Stanford University Medical Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Journal of Pathology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ma et al. Profiling and Discovery of Novel miRNAs from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Melanoma and Nodal Specimens. Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, 2009; DOI: 10.2353/jmoldx.2009.090041

Cite This Page:

American Journal of Pathology. "Predicting Cancer Prognosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090827123216.htm>.
American Journal of Pathology. (2009, August 28). Predicting Cancer Prognosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090827123216.htm
American Journal of Pathology. "Predicting Cancer Prognosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090827123216.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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