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Handwriting-based Tool Offers Alternate Lie Detection Method

Date:
August 29, 2009
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A handwriting lie detection tool may change the face of effective law enforcement. Researchers utilized a computerized tablet that measured the physical properties of the subject's handwriting, which are difficult to consciously control. They have found that these handwriting characteristics differ when an individual is in the process of writing deceptive sentences as opposed to truthful sentences.

Researchers are now discovering that with the aid of a computerized tool, handwriting characteristics can be measured more effectively.
Credit: iStockphoto/Pali Rao

For ages experts and laymen have been analyzing and trying to crack the code of handwriting characteristics, in order to detect an individual's personality traits, or in most cases, gauge their innocence in the case of a crime. Although this science has often gone the way of pseudoscience, researchers are now discovering that with the aid of a computerized tool, handwriting characteristics can be measured more effectively.

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The research, headed by Gil Luria and Sara Rosenblum at the University of Haifa, is published in an upcoming issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology. The researchers utilized a computerized tablet that measured the physical properties of the subject's handwriting, which are difficult to consciously control (for example: the duration of time that the pen is on paper versus in the air, the length height and width of each writing stroke, the pressure implemented on the writing surface). They have found that these handwriting characteristics differ when an individual is in the process of writing deceptive sentences as opposed to truthful sentences.

The handwriting tool has the potential to replace, or work in tandem, with popular, verbal-based lie detection technology such as the polygraph to ensure greater accuracy and objectivity in law enforcement deception detection.

Additionally, polygraphs are often intrusive to the subject and sometimes inconclusive. The handwriting tool therefore provides ease and increased accuracy over common, verbal-based methods.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gil Luria, Sara Rosenblum. Comparing the handwriting behaviours of true and false writing with computerized handwriting measures. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2009; n/a DOI: 10.1002/acp.1621

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Handwriting-based Tool Offers Alternate Lie Detection Method." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090828103916.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2009, August 29). Handwriting-based Tool Offers Alternate Lie Detection Method. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090828103916.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Handwriting-based Tool Offers Alternate Lie Detection Method." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090828103916.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

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