Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Unique Cancer Profile Of Hispanic/Latino Americans

Date:
September 16, 2009
Source:
American Cancer Society
Summary:
Report finds Hispanic/Latino Americans are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to develop and die from all cancers combined as well as the four most common cancers, but have higher rates of several cancers related to infections and are more likely to have cancer detected at a later stage.

The latest edition of Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos reports that Hispanic/Latino Americans –the largest, fastest-growing, and youngest minority in the United States—have a unique cancer risk profile that requires a targeted approach to cancer prevention. The report finds Hispanic/Latino Americans are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to develop and die from all cancers combined as well as the four most common cancers (female breast, prostate, colorectum, and lung). However, Hispanics have higher rates of several cancers related to infections (stomach, liver, and cervix) and are more likely to have cancer detected at a later stage.

Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos, first published in 2000 and updated every three years, provides the estimated numbers of new cancer cases and deaths in Hispanics in the current year as well as other cancer statistics for Hispanics, including incidence, survival, and death rates, risk factor data, and screening prevalence. It is intended as a source of information for community leaders, public health and health care workers, and others interested in cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment for Hispanics. The authors of the publication note that most cancer data in the United States are reported for Hispanics as an aggregate group, which may mask differences that exist between Hispanic subpopulations according to country of origin and length of time in the US. Highlights from the new edition, Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2009-2011, include:

An estimated 98,900 new cancer cases will be diagnosed in Hispanic/Latinos in 2009. Prostate is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, while breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Colorectal cancer is the second-most common cancer in both men and women.

An estimated 18,800 Hispanics are expected to die from cancer in 2009; the top two causes of cancer death among men are lung and colorectal cancer, while breast and lung cancer are the top two in women.

Between 1997 and 2006, cancer incidence rates decreased among Hispanics by 1.3% per year in men and 0.6% per year in women, compared to decreases of 0.8% per year and 0.4% per year in non-Hispanic white men and women, respectively.

During the same time period, cancer death rates among Hispanics decreased by 2.2% per year in men and 1.2% per year in women, compared to decreases in non-Hispanic whites of 1.5% per year in men and 0.9% per year in women.

The report also finds that compared to non-Hispanic whites, Hispanic/Latino Americans:

  • have lower incidence and death rates for all cancers combined and for the most common cancer sites (prostate, breast, lung, and colorectum);
  • have higher rates of cancers of the stomach, cervix, liver, and gallbladder, and of acute lymphocytic leukemia;
  • have a later stage of diagnosis for many cancers, including breast and melanoma;
  • have generally similar 5-year survival, except for melanoma, for which survival rates are lower in Hispanic compared to non-Hispanic white men (79% versus 87%) and women (88% versus 92%);
  • are less likely to smoke and drink alcohol;
  • and are more likely to be poor, have fewer years of education, and lack health insurance.

"The Hispanic/Latino population will benefit from the same approaches that are most important in reducing cancer risk in the general population – preventing and treating tobacco dependence, increasing access to immunization programs, high quality cancer screening and appropriate follow-up care, increasing physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight," said Vilma Cokkinides, Ph.D., American Cancer Society director for risk factor surveillance. "In addition, many Hispanics face barriers to receiving adequate, affordable health care that likely have a significant impact on prevention, early detection, and treatment of cancer."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Cancer Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Cancer Society. "Unique Cancer Profile Of Hispanic/Latino Americans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915101145.htm>.
American Cancer Society. (2009, September 16). Unique Cancer Profile Of Hispanic/Latino Americans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915101145.htm
American Cancer Society. "Unique Cancer Profile Of Hispanic/Latino Americans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915101145.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins