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What Are The Risk Factors For Rebleeding After Negative Angiography?

Date:
September 16, 2009
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
A research team form South Korea investigated possible predictive factors for rebleeding after angiographically negative findings in patients with acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. They found that clinical factors including underlying malignancy, liver cirrhosis, and hematemesis are important predictors for rebleeding after angiographically negative findings in patients with acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.
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Acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for approximately 20% of emergency room visits and 5% of admissions. Although endoscopy has been used as a first-line treatment option in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, angiographic intervention can be used as a safe diagnostic and treatment method in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic treatment. The incidence of rebleeding in patients with negative initial angiography has been reported in up to 60% of cases. However, little is known about the predictive factors for rebleeding.

A research article to be published on August 28, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. A research team led by Hyo-Cheol Kim from Seoul National University Hospital, Korea, identified the possible predictive factors for rebleeding after negative angiographic findings in patients with acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.

One hundred and twenty eight patients with acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding had negative findings after initial angiography. Clinical and laboratory parameters were analyzed retrospectively.

They found that clinical factors including underlying malignancy, liver cirrhosis, and hematemesis are important predictors for rebleeding after angiographically negative findings in patients with acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joo et al. Risk factors for rebleeding after angiographically negative acute gastrointestinal bleeding. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2009; 15 (32): 4023 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.15.4023

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "What Are The Risk Factors For Rebleeding After Negative Angiography?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090916090902.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2009, September 16). What Are The Risk Factors For Rebleeding After Negative Angiography?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090916090902.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "What Are The Risk Factors For Rebleeding After Negative Angiography?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090916090902.htm (accessed September 1, 2015).

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