Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Poor Money Management May Be Early Indicator Of Alzheimer's Disease, Say UAB Researchers

Date:
September 23, 2009
Source:
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Summary:
Inability to handle financial transactions or manage money may be an early indicator that a person with mild memory problems soon is likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research. The study examined patients with a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), thought to be a precursor to Alzheimer's.

Inability to handle financial transactions or manage money may be an early indicator that a person with mild memory problems soon is likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Alzheimer's Disease Center, part of the Department of Neurology.

The findings, published in the Sept. 22 edition of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, examined patients with a condition known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), thought to be a precursor to Alzheimer's.

The researchers followed 87 people with MCI and 76 controls with no memory problems. The participant's ability to manage certain financial skills was assessed at the beginning of the study and then again one year later, using a UAB-developed tool called the Financial Capacity Instrument (FCI). The skills included understanding a bank statement, balancing a checkbook, paying bills, preparing bills for mailing and counting coins and currency.

During the course of the year, 25 of the MCI patients had progressed to Alzheimer's disease. The overall FCI scores for those 25 participants decreased 6 percent from their original scores and 9 percent for checkbook-management skills. The control group and those MCI patients who did not progress to dementia maintained the level of their FCI scores throughout the year.

"Declining financial skills are detectable in patients with mild cognitive impairment in the year before their conversion to Alzheimer's disease," said Daniel Marson, Ph.D., JD, professor of neurology and director of the UAB Alzheimer's Disease Center. "This indicates that physicians and health-care providers need to watch patients with MCI closely for declining financial skills and advise families and caregivers to take steps to avoid negative financial events."

Marson suggests that caregivers can oversee a patient's checking transactions, contact the patient's bank to detect irregularities such as bills being paid twice or become co-signers on a checking account so that joint signature is required for checks above a certain amount. Online banking and bill payment services are additional options for families.

"Financial capacity has emerged as a key activity of daily living in understanding functional impairment and decline in patients with MCI and dementia," said Marson. "The capacity to manage one's own financial affairs is critical to success in independent living. Impairments in financial skills and judgment are often the first functional changes demonstrated by patients with incipient dementia."

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging, one of the National Institutes of Health. Contributing to the study were Kristen Triebel, PsyD, Roy Martin, Ph.D., H.R. Griffith, Ph.D., Lindy Harrell, M.D., Ph.D., David Clark, M.D., and John Brockington, M.D., from the Department of Neurology; Janice Marceaux, M.A., and Ozioma Okonkwo, from the Department of Psychology; and Alfred Bartolucci, Ph.D., from the Department of Biostatistics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Poor Money Management May Be Early Indicator Of Alzheimer's Disease, Say UAB Researchers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090921161752.htm>.
University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2009, September 23). Poor Money Management May Be Early Indicator Of Alzheimer's Disease, Say UAB Researchers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090921161752.htm
University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Poor Money Management May Be Early Indicator Of Alzheimer's Disease, Say UAB Researchers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090921161752.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) — A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) — A 111-year-old Japanese was certified as the world's oldest man by Guinness World Records on Wednesday. Sakari Momoi, a native of Fukushima in northern Japan, was given a certificate at a hospital in Tokyo. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) — Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins