Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Resident Physicians Seldom Trained In Skin Cancer Examination

Date:
October 19, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Many resident physicians are not trained in skin cancer examinations, nor have they ever observed or practiced the procedure, according to a new report.

Many resident physicians are not trained in skin cancer examinations, nor have they ever observed or practiced the procedure, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Melanoma is the only cancer that can be detected early for which U.S. death rates are not decreasing, according to background information in the article. Although melanoma remains the second most common cause of cancer in individuals age 15 to 29, screening rates have not changed in recent years. "In response, a number of recommendations have been made to provide training programs for instruction of the skin cancer examination," the authors write. About one-fourth of all melanomas are detected by physicians as opposed to patients, and a consensus is emerging that cancers detected by a clinician are generally thinner and have a better prognosis. However, most primary care physicians do not regularly perform skin examinations.

Emily Wise, M.D., of the Boston University School of Medicine, and colleagues surveyed resident physicians in family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and internal medicine in November 2003. Residents reported their training and experience with skin cancer examinations, along with their current skill level in performing the exams.

Of 454 surveys distributed, 342 residents in four programs completed the survey (a 75.3 percent response rate). "Clinical training for the skin cancer examination during residency was infrequent," the authors write. "During residency, 75.8 percent were never trained in the skin cancer examination, 55.3 percent never observed a skin cancer examination and 57.4 percent never practiced the examination. Only 15.9 percent of residents reported being skilled in the skin cancer examination."

Performing four skin cancer examinations -- an average of slightly more than one per year of residency -- was associated with increases in self-reported skill levels.

"Visits to internists and family practitioners make up an estimated 40 percent of physician visits in the United States, and nearly two-thirds of patients with melanoma report a physician visit in the year before diagnosis. Primary care physicians are thus ideally suited to screen and triage high-risk patients and those with suspicious lesions," the authors write.

"Residency programs and medical schools may have neither the time nor the infrastructure to teach an expert, comprehensive examination to all physicians in training," they conclude. "However, the basic ability to recognize potentially suspicious lesions and triage persons with such lesions should be a vital and key component of both training programs. If current physicians in training do not learn this skill set in medical school or residency, there is a low likelihood that they will acquire this knowledge in their day-to-day practice, which could have potentially devastating consequences for melanoma recognition going forward."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Emily Wise; Deeptej Singh; Megan Moore; Benjamin Hayes; Katie Brooks Biello; Mary Curry Dickerson; Rachel Ness; Alan Geller. Rates of Skin Cancer Screening and Prevention Counseling by US Medical Residents. Archives of Dermatology, 2009; 145 (10): 1131 DOI: 10.1001/archdermatol.2009.242

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Resident Physicians Seldom Trained In Skin Cancer Examination." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019172109.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, October 19). Resident Physicians Seldom Trained In Skin Cancer Examination. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019172109.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Resident Physicians Seldom Trained In Skin Cancer Examination." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091019172109.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins