Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adding Proton Therapy 'Boost' To X-ray Radiation Therapy Reduces Prostate Cancer Recurrences

Date:
November 2, 2009
Source:
American Society for Radiation Oncology
Summary:
Men who receive a "boost" of proton therapy after receiving a standard course of X-ray radiation therapy have fewer prostate cancer recurrences compared to men who did not receive the extra dose of proton radiation.

Men who receive a "boost" of proton therapy after receiving a standard course of X-ray radiation therapy have fewer recurrences of their prostate cancer compared to men who did not receive the extra dose of proton radiation, according to a first-of-its-kind study presented November 2, 2009, at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 51st Annual Meeting in Chicago. The multi-institutional, randomized trial also shows that the high dose treatment is safe for these patients and causes no severe problems later with urinary or bowel functions.

Related Articles


"There is a lot of interest in proton therapy for prostate cancer. This study proves the importance of giving high radiation doses to prostate cancer patients with low- and intermediate- risk disease because it demonstrates that even these 'favorable' patients still benefit from the extra high-dose treatment," Carl J. Rossi Jr., M.D., a study author and a radiation oncologist at the Loma Linda University Medical Center in Loma Linda, Calif., said. "It also shows that so long as these higher doses are given with a highly conformal technique, such as proton beam therapy, then they can be delivered safely and with minimal side effects.

Proton beam therapy is a form of external beam radiation treatment that uses protons rather than photon X-rays to treat certain types of cancer and other diseases. The physical characteristics of the proton therapy beam allow the radiation oncologist to more effectively reduce the radiation dose to nearby healthy tissue.

During external beam radiation therapy, a beam of radiation is directed through the skin to the cancer and the immediate surrounding area in order to destroy the main tumor and any nearby cancer cells.

The study involved 391 patients with early prostate cancer (cancer that has not spread out of the prostate) receiving proton treatments at Loma Linda University Medical Center and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Patients were randomized to receive either "standard dose" or "high dose" radiation, with proton beams being used to deliver the high-dose radiotherapy to prostate.

Findings show that in patients with a low risk of having the cancer return (recurrence), only six percent of patients who were treated with high dose radiation had the cancer return after 10 years, compared to 29 percent who had conventional radiation doses. Similarly, of the patients with an intermediate risk of cancer recurrence, 37 percent who underwent high dose radiation had cancer come back, versus 45 percent of those who had conventional doses of radiation. There were no significant differences between the two groups in how long they survived and in their urinary and bowel functions.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Radiation Oncology. "Adding Proton Therapy 'Boost' To X-ray Radiation Therapy Reduces Prostate Cancer Recurrences." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091102121502.htm>.
American Society for Radiation Oncology. (2009, November 2). Adding Proton Therapy 'Boost' To X-ray Radiation Therapy Reduces Prostate Cancer Recurrences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091102121502.htm
American Society for Radiation Oncology. "Adding Proton Therapy 'Boost' To X-ray Radiation Therapy Reduces Prostate Cancer Recurrences." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091102121502.htm (accessed March 2, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, March 2, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Treadmill Test Can Predict Chance Of Death Within A Decade

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) Johns Hopkins researchers analyzed 58,000 heart stress tests to come up with a formula that predicts a person&apos;s chances of dying in the next decade. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Going Gluten-Free Could Get You A Tax Break

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) If a doctor advises you to remove gluten from your diet, you could get a tax deduction on the amount you spend on gluten-free foods. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis Try Swapping Success

GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis Try Swapping Success

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 2, 2015) GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis have completed a series of asset swaps worth more than $20 billion. As Grace Pascoe reports they say the deal will reshape both drugmakers. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Can West Africa Rebuild After Ebola?

How Can West Africa Rebuild After Ebola?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 2, 2015) How best to rebuild the three West African countries struggling with Ebola will be discussed in Brussels this week. As Hayley Platt reports Sierra Leone has the toughest job ahead - its once thriving economy has been ravaged by the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins