Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Software knowledge unnecessarily lost

Date:
November 21, 2009
Source:
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research)
Summary:
All too often the knowledge acquired by software architects is unnecessarily lost. Moreover, it is difficult to simply and quickly assess the quality of software. According to researchers these problems can, however, be easily resolved. They investigated how architectural knowledge can be better disseminated and retrieved.

All too often the knowledge acquired by software architects is unnecessarily lost. Moreover, it is difficult to simply and quickly assess the quality of software. According to Dutch researchers Remco de Boer and Rik Farenhorst these problems can, however, be easily resolved. They investigated how architectural knowledge can be better disseminated and retrieved.

The design and construction of large software systems demands a lot of creativity and knowledge on the part of software architects. During projects such as the OV-chipkaart (digital public transport pass) or digital tax return form, due consideration needs to be given to security requirements, ease of use and performance. The architect incorporates these requirements and the wishes of his clients in the design and must at the same time allow for the technical limitations and possibilities. Architects who do not have or cannot access the right knowledge in time, keep on 'reinventing the wheel'.

Rik Farenhorst investigated how software architects can share their knowledge more easily. He discovered that many architects simply talk too little with each other. They want to receive knowledge, but are less willing to pass it on. He calls for a combination of two forms of knowledge sharing: using fixed templates in which architectural knowledge can be recorded and through open communication. Such open communication could be facilitated by forums or 'yellow pages' that allow the architects to find each other.

Assessing software

Remco de Boer examined the role of auditors. These auditors assess the quality of software systems. This means that they must often wade through piles of paperwork looking for the information they need, for example about the decisions that an architect has made during the design process. De Boer developed a method for guiding auditors through this information to ensure that less time and money is lost in endless searches.

Farenhorst and De Boer carried out their research in collaboration with several IT companies. These organisations indicated that the design and evaluation processes for their software often proceed with difficulty. Farenhorst and De Boer have now demonstrated how these difficulties can largely be resolved.

Farenhorst's and De Boer's research was part of the NWO programme Joint Academic and Commercial Quality Research & Development (JACQUARD). They carried out their work within the GRIFFIN project, which is describing how and why software engineers take decisions about the architecture of their software. GRIFFIN is a consortium of academic and industrial partners.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). "Software knowledge unnecessarily lost." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091118120309.htm>.
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). (2009, November 21). Software knowledge unnecessarily lost. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091118120309.htm
NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research). "Software knowledge unnecessarily lost." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091118120309.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mobile App Gives Tour of Battle of Atlanta Sites

Mobile App Gives Tour of Battle of Atlanta Sites

AP (July 25, 2014) Emory University's Center for Digital Scholarship has launched a self-guided mobile tour app to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's Battle of Atlanta. (July 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

AFP (July 24, 2014) Health and agriculture development are key if African countries are to overcome poverty and grow, US software billionaire Bill Gates said Thursday, as he received an honourary degree in Ethiopia. Duration: 00:36 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins