Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bullying at school linked to bullying at home

Date:
December 10, 2009
Source:
British Psychological Society (BPS)
Summary:
Children who bully at school are likely to also bully their siblings at home. This is the finding of a new study. Researchers investigated whether the age and gender of a child’s siblings predicted whether children were likely to bully, or to become victims of bullying.

Children who bully at school are likely to also bully their siblings at home.

This is the finding of a study published online in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology.

Dr Ersilia Menesini and colleagues at the Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Italy, designed the study to investigate whether the age and gender of a child's siblings predicted whether children were likely to bully, or to become victims of bullying. They also looked for links between sibling bullying and school bullying

A total of 195 children aged between 10 and 12 took part in the study. All of the children had a sibling no more than four years older or younger than them. Children were given questionnaires that asked whether they were a victim of bullying, or bullied their peers at school, and whether they were a victim of bullying by a sibling or bullied a sibling at home.

Dr Menesini said: "We found that children with older male siblings were the most victimised group.

It was also the case that significantly more boys than girls told us that they bullied their sibling -- who was most likely to be younger than them. It's likely that this form of sibling bullying is all about maintaining a position of dominance.

"However, for girls, bullying is mainly related to a poor quality of sibling relationship and not to birth order. In fact, high levels of conflict and low levels of empathy were significantly related to sibling bullying and sibling victimization."

A significant link between bullying and victimisation patterns at home and at school was found. Children who bullied siblings were likely to bully their peers, while victims at home were likely to also be victimized at school. Dr Menesini continued: "It is not possible to tell from our study which behaviour comes first, but it is likely that if children behave in a certain way at home, bullying a sibling for instance, if this behaviour goes unchecked they may take this behaviour into school." In conclusion this study gives immediate implications for interventions. In order to prevent and reduce sibling bullying, parents should attend to sibling relationships and attempt to mediate and reduce high levels of conflict, especially if they have older sons and if the sibling relationship appears negative and highly hostile.

School teachers, on the other hand, will need to adopt a 'family -- school' focus to understand bullying and to prevent its diffusion. Bullying can start at an early age and greater efforts should be made to prevent and to combat its growth at home in order to reduce bullying and victimization in school.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by British Psychological Society (BPS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ersilia Menesini, Marina Camodeca and Annalaura Nocentini. Bullying among siblings: The role of personality and relational variables. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 2009; DOI: 10.1348/026151009X479402

Cite This Page:

British Psychological Society (BPS). "Bullying at school linked to bullying at home." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091206185410.htm>.
British Psychological Society (BPS). (2009, December 10). Bullying at school linked to bullying at home. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091206185410.htm
British Psychological Society (BPS). "Bullying at school linked to bullying at home." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091206185410.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Science & Society News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

German World War II Bomber Found in Croatia's Adriatic

German World War II Bomber Found in Croatia's Adriatic

AFP (Oct. 2, 2014) A rare, well-preserved German World War II bomber has been found in Croatia's central Adriatic more than seven decades after it was shot down, the national conservation institute said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Japan Volcano Rescue Video Released

Raw: Japan Volcano Rescue Video Released

AP (Oct. 2, 2014) The Tokyo Fire Department released video of rescue efforts following Saturday's eruption of Mount Ontake in central Japan. It shows firefighters and military troops carrying injured people as plumes of smoke pour from the volcano behind them. (Oct. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) Japan's bullet train turns 50 Wednesday. Here's a look at how it's changed over half a century — and the changes it's inspired globally. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) Police body cameras are gradually being rolled out across the US, with interest surging after the fatal police shooting in August of an unarmed black teenager. Duration: 02:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins