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Rapid flu testing differentiates strains of influenza

Date:
December 30, 2009
Source:
American Journal of Pathology
Summary:
Researchers have developed a rapid, automated system to differentiate strains of influenza.

Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin, the Children's Research Institute, and the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin have developed a rapid, automated system to differentiate strains of influenza.

In pandemic infection, such as the present H1N1 influenza outbreak, rapid automated tests are needed in order to make quick and effective public health decisions. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) is a sensitive and specific method for identifying flu substrains; however, technician and assay time are significantly longer than less accurate rapid influenza diagnostic tests.

A group led by Dr. Kelly J. Henrickson of the Medical College of Wisconsin have developed rapid semi- and fully-automated multiplex real-time RT-PCR assays to detect influenza A, influenza B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). These assays can successfully detect human H1N1, H3N2, and swine-origin H1N1 viruses as well as distinguish these from influenza B and RSV infections. These assays could test large numbers of samples over a very short time, allowing for a significant decrease in both technician and assay time.

Beck et al suggest that "this outbreak demonstrates the importance of having rapid, reliable, sensitive, and specific assays that allow clinicians and public health officials to react quickly and effectively during viral outbreaks."

These studies were funded by the Midwest Respiratory Virus Program Clinical Laboratory.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Journal of Pathology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Beck, ET, Jurgens LA, Kehl SC, Bose ME, Patitucci T, LaGue E, Darga, P, Wilkinson K, Witt LM, Fan J, He J, Kumar S, Henrickson KJ:. Development of a rapid automated influenza A, influenza B, and RSV A/B multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay and its use during the 2009 H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) epidemic in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, 2010, 12:74-81

Cite This Page:

American Journal of Pathology. "Rapid flu testing differentiates strains of influenza." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091229164945.htm>.
American Journal of Pathology. (2009, December 30). Rapid flu testing differentiates strains of influenza. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091229164945.htm
American Journal of Pathology. "Rapid flu testing differentiates strains of influenza." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091229164945.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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