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How much ice needed to create Martian land formations?

Date:
December 31, 2009
Source:
American Geophysical Union
Summary:
Some land formations on Mars suggest the presence of water ice. These features could have been created by viscous creep of ice below the surface in Martian permafrost. To determine how much ice would be needed to form the observed topography on Mars, researchers conducted laboratory experiments to simulate the frozen Martian sand.

Some land formations on Mars suggest the presence of water ice. These features could have been created by viscous creep of ice below the surface in Martian permafrost. To determine how much ice would be needed to form the observed topography on Mars, Durham et al. conducted laboratory experiments to simulate the frozen Martian sand.

They tested frozen sand mixtures with different types of sand and with various amounts of ice. Surprisingly, the authors found that the most important factor affecting whether the mixture was mobile or jammed was not the amount of ice, or the temperature or stress on the mixture, but the dry packing density of the sand. They found that the minimum amount of ice needed to mobilize the sand is the amount that fills the pore space at the dry packing density of the sand.

The results help explain some of the land formations seen on Mars and provide a new way to estimate Martian water content.

The research is published in Geophysical Research Letters. Authors include William B. Durham and Hendrik J Lenferink: Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Asmin V. Pathare: Planetary Science Institute, Pasadena, California, USA; Laura A. Stern: U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Geophysical Union. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Durham et al. Mobility of icy sand packs, with application to Martian permafrost. Geophysical Research Letters, 2009; 36 (23): L23203 DOI: 10.1029/2009GL040392

Cite This Page:

American Geophysical Union. "How much ice needed to create Martian land formations?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091230183350.htm>.
American Geophysical Union. (2009, December 31). How much ice needed to create Martian land formations?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091230183350.htm
American Geophysical Union. "How much ice needed to create Martian land formations?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091230183350.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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