Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study examines prescribing of antipsychotic medications for nursing home residents

Date:
January 14, 2010
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Older adults newly admitted to nursing homes with high rates of antipsychotic prescribing in the previous year are more likely to receive antipsychotic agents, according to a new study. Of these treated patients, some had no identified clinical indication for this therapy.

Older adults newly admitted to nursing homes with high rates of antipsychotic prescribing in the previous year are more likely to receive antipsychotic agents, according to a report in the January 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Of these treated patients, some had no identified clinical indication for this therapy.

In 2007, almost one-third of U.S. nursing home residents received antipsychotic drugs, according to background information in the article. Safety concerns regarding their use are increasing; in 2005, the Food and Drug Administration issued warnings regarding the risk of death among older adults with dementia taking these agents to control behavioral symptoms. A large clinical trial recently concluded that the adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs outweighed the benefits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Yong Chen, M.D., M.H.S., of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, and colleagues assessed antipsychotic prescribing among 16,586 residents newly admitted to 1,257 nursing homes in 2006. They computed each facility's antipsychotic prescription rates based on 2005 prescribing patterns and analyzed whether these rates, along with individual characteristics, were associated with the likelihood of new residents receiving antipsychotic prescriptions.

About 30 percent (4,818) of new residents in the study received at least one antipsychotic medication in 2006, of whom 32 percent (1,545) did not have dementia, psychosis or any other clinical indication for this therapy. "Residents newly admitted to nursing homes with the highest prescribing rates were 1.37 times more likely to receive an antipsychotic medication relative to those in the nursing homes with the lowest prescribing rates," the authors write. "The influence of the facility-level prescribing rate was most apparent in residents without psychosis, who have the weakest indication for antipsychotic medication use."

The increase in medication use may reflect the increasing proportion of nursing home residents diagnosed with psychoses, the authors note. "However, residents diagnosed as having schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or aggressive behavioral symptoms of dementia accounted for only a small proportion of antipsychotic medication use," they continue. "In addition, we found that 16.4 percent of residents who had no clinical indication for antipsychotic therapy (no psychoses and no dementia) received antipsychotic medication."

The study suggests that organizational culture at some nursing homes may encourage the prescribing of antipsychotics, the authors note. "Future research is needed to determine why such a prescribing culture exists and whether there are adverse health consequences as a result of our observed facility-level antipsychotic prescribing rate," they conclude. "This study may also inform future policies to target nursing homes with high antipsychotic prescribing rates to improve quality of care for nursing home residents."

This study was supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Briesacher and co-authors Dr. Tija and Dr. Lau are also supported by Research Scientist Development Awards from the National Institute on Aging.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yong Chen; Becky A. Briesacher; Terry S. Field; Jennifer Tjia; Denys T. Lau; Jerry H. Gurwitz. Unexplained Variation Across US Nursing Homes in Antipsychotic Prescribing Rates. Arch Intern Med, 2010; 170 (1): 89-95 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Study examines prescribing of antipsychotic medications for nursing home residents." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100111161935.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2010, January 14). Study examines prescribing of antipsychotic medications for nursing home residents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100111161935.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Study examines prescribing of antipsychotic medications for nursing home residents." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100111161935.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Researchers say women who diet at a young age are at greater risk of developing harmful health habits, including eating disorders and alcohol abuse. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

Newsy (July 29, 2014) If you've been looking for love online, there's a chance somebody has been looking at how you're looking. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins