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Chronic Morphine Use Delays Wound Healing

Date:
January 23, 2010
Source:
American Journal of Pathology
Summary:
Researchers have found that chronic morphine use delays wound healing in the presence on an infection.

Researchers led by Dr. Sabita Roy at the University of Minnesota have found that chronic morphine use delays wound healing in the presence on an infection.

They report their data in the February 2010 issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

Morphine acts on cells in the central nervous system, resulting in pain relief and analgesia; however, morphine use may also affect the immune system. Indeed, chronic morphine users and opioid abusers have inadequate wound closure and increased susceptibility to infection.

To further address this issue, Martin et al examined wound healing in a mouse model of chronic morphine use/abuse. In the presence of inflammation, chronic morphine exposure resulted in a marked decrease in wound closure, compromised wound integrity, and increased bacterial sepsis. With morphine exposure, expression of particular immune molecules was altered, which led to decreased recruitment of immune cells to the wound site. New blood vessel formation and recruitment of replacement cells were also suppressed in these animals. These data suggest that the immunosuppression due to morphine treatment delays immune cell recruitment, leading to lack of bacterial clearance and delayed wound closure.

Dr. Roy's group concludes that "these studies provide an in vivo tool by which further mechanistic experiments can be performed to address why, clinically, heroin-addicted patients often present with infected non-healing wounds. Understanding these underlying mechanisms affords improved treatment options not only for chronic morphine users and abusers, but can also have translational implications for immuno-compromised populations such as the elderly or those who are chronically stressed."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Journal of Pathology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Martin JL, Koodie L, Krishnan AG, Charboneau R, Barke RA, Roy S. Chronic Morphine Administration Delays Wound Healing by Inhibiting Immune Cell Recruitment to the Wound Site. American Journal Of Pathology, 2009; DOI: 10.2353/ajpath.2010.090457

Cite This Page:

American Journal of Pathology. "Chronic Morphine Use Delays Wound Healing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100122002914.htm>.
American Journal of Pathology. (2010, January 23). Chronic Morphine Use Delays Wound Healing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100122002914.htm
American Journal of Pathology. "Chronic Morphine Use Delays Wound Healing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100122002914.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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