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Shape of Barrett's epithelium effects prevalence of erosive esophagitis

Date:
February 5, 2010
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Scientists conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine the correlation of the shape and length of Barrett's epithelium with erosive esophagitis. They found that flame-like rather than lotus-like Barrett's epithelium, and Barrett's epithelium with a longer segment were more strongly associated with erosive esophagitis.

Barrett's epithelium is recognized as a complication of erosive esophagitis and is the pre-malignant condition for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

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A research team from Yokohama City University School of Medicine hypothesized that some macroscopic features of Barrett's epithelium might be useful for identifying a subgroup with a high risk for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Their study will be published on January 28, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

They enrolled 869 patients who underwent endoscopy during a health checkup at their hospital. Based on the Prague C & M Criteria, they originally classified cases of Barrett's epithelium into two types based on its shape, namely, flame-like and lotus-like Barrett's epithelium, and into two groups based on its length, its C extent < 2 cm, and ≥ 2 cm.

They found that Barrett's epithelium was diagnosed in 374 cases (43%). Most of these were diagnosed as short-segment Barrett's epithelium. The prevalence of erosive esophagitis was significantly higher in subjects with flame-like than lotus-like Barrett's epithelium, and in those with a C extent of ≥ 2 cm than < 2 cm.

This study may represent a future strategy for intervention in the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Akiyama et al. Shape of Barrett's epithelium is associated with prevalence of erosive esophagitis. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2010; 16 (4): 484 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v16.i4.484

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Shape of Barrett's epithelium effects prevalence of erosive esophagitis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100205102554.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2010, February 5). Shape of Barrett's epithelium effects prevalence of erosive esophagitis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100205102554.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Shape of Barrett's epithelium effects prevalence of erosive esophagitis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100205102554.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

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