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Treatment of portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis

Date:
March 4, 2010
Source:
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Summary:
Calculus Bovis compound preparation can effectively prevent pulmonary complications of portal hypertensive rabbits with schistosomiasis. The successful development of Calculus Bovis and the preliminary study on portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions caused by schistosomiasis suggest that it is of great significance and prospects for further basic and clinical research, development and clinical application of new drugs and preparations to treat portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis.

To evaluate efficacy of Calculus Bovis compound preparation (ICCBco) in the treatment of lung lesions in portal hypertensive rabbits with schistosomiasis as the experimental animal model, a research group in China performed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to observe pathological changes and pathological effect mechanism of expression of fibronectin and laminin in the lung tissue of portal hypertensive rabbits with schistosomiasis.

In vitro cultivated ICCBco is composed of Calculus Bovis, Chinese Paris Rhizome, polygonum cuspidatum, appendiculate cremastra pseudobulb, frankincense, and myrrh, and has the functions of clearing away heat and toxic materials, removing blood stasis, reducing swelling, eliminating blood stasis and promoting tissue regeneration, according to the principle of traditional Chinese medicine. However, the topic has not been unequivocally addressed.

A research article published on February 14, 2010 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The group led by Tao Li, MD, evaluated the efficacy of ICCBco in the treatment of lung lesions in portal hypertensive rabbits with schistosomiasis as the experimental animal model. They explored the pathogenesis of portal hypertension and the prevention and treatment of its pulmonary complications (hepatopulmonary syndrome, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension) from a new perspective of portal hypertensive vascular disease. Calculus Bovis is a Class 1 new Chinese medicine developed by Wuhan Tongji Hospital with independent intellectual property rights, is a treasure of traditional Chinese medicine. To investigate its role in the treatment of schistosomiasis-induced pulmonary complications of portal hypertension has far-reaching significance.

The successful development of Calculus Bovis and the preliminary study on portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions caused by schistosomiasis suggest that it is of great significance and prospects for further basic and clinical research, development and clinical application of new drugs and preparations to treat portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by World Journal of Gastroenterology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Li T, Yang Z, Cai HJ, Song LW, Lu KY, Zhou Z, Wu ZD. Effects of in vitro cultivated Calculus Bovis compound on pulmonary lesions in rabbits with schistosomiasis. World Journal of Gastroenterology, 2010; 16 (6): 749 DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v16.i6.749

Cite This Page:

World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Treatment of portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304102208.htm>.
World Journal of Gastroenterology. (2010, March 4). Treatment of portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304102208.htm
World Journal of Gastroenterology. "Treatment of portal hypertensive pulmonary lesions induced by schistosomiasis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100304102208.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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