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Perceived health can predict survival of esophago-gastric cancer

Date:
March 9, 2010
Source:
Karolinska Institutet
Summary:
Changes in patients' self-rated quality of life after treatment for esophago-gastric cancer can predict the chances for long-term survival, according to new Swedish research.

Changes in patients' self-rated quality of life after treatment for esophago-gastric cancer can predict the chances for long-term survival.

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This is the result researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet made, in a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"The patient's self-rated quality of life, provide indications of whether he or she will survive. If the patient is experiencing poor physical recovery, fatigue and pain after treatment, this should be taken very seriously and lead to further investigation," says Pernilla Lagergren, researcher at Karolinska Institutet.

Esophageal and gastric cancers are aggressive tumors and the chance of surviving five years after treatment, is approximately 30-50 percent. Therefore it is very urgent to find factors that can predict the chances of survival after treatment.

In the present study the scientists at Karolinska Institutet used a well-tested questionnaire to measure patients' self-rated quality of life among 132 patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer. The survey measures the six functional aspects of health and eight frequent symptoms in cancer patients. Participants in the study filled in a questionnaire before and six months after treatment. Patients were followed up at least five years and they looked primarily at how many people survived.

The results of this study show that patients who have problems with shortness of breathe before treatment have a poorer chance of survival. Patients who recovered physical function after six months had a better chance of survival compared with patients who do not recover their physical functions. Patients who reported greater problems with fatigue or pain had a smaller chance of survival compared with those who did not experience such problems.

"An explanation for this may be that the patient unconsciously detects the recurrence of the tumor before it can be determined by the health care system," says Lagergren.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Karolinska Institutet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Djärv T, Metcalfe C, Avery K, Lagergren P, Blazeby JM. Prognostic Value of Changes in Health-Related Quality of Life Scores During Curative Treatment for Esophagogastric Cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2010; DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2009.23.5143

Cite This Page:

Karolinska Institutet. "Perceived health can predict survival of esophago-gastric cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100309083658.htm>.
Karolinska Institutet. (2010, March 9). Perceived health can predict survival of esophago-gastric cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100309083658.htm
Karolinska Institutet. "Perceived health can predict survival of esophago-gastric cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100309083658.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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