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Controlling structure on the nanoscale could lead to better superconductors

Date:
March 16, 2010
Source:
American Physical Society
Summary:
A new experiment shows how adjacent regions affect each other in superconductors, and suggests ways that the materials could be improved by controlling their nanoscopic structures.

Superconductors, materials in which current flows without resistance, have tantalizing applications. But even the highest-temperature superconductors require extreme cooling before the effect kicks in, so researchers want to know when and how superconductivity comes about in order to coax it into existence at room temperature. Now a team has shown that, in a copper-based superconductor, tiny areas of weak superconductivity hold up at higher temperatures when surrounded by regions of strong superconductivity.

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The experiment is reported in current issue of Physical Review Letters and highlighted with a Viewpoint in Physics by Jenny Hoffman of Harvard University.

Researchers have long known that both superconducting and normal currents can leak back and forth between adjacent layers of superconducting material and metal. In copper-based ceramic superconductors, made up of many different elements, superconductivity varies within nanometers depending on which atoms are nearby. These tiny regions can influence each other in much the same way that thin layers of metal and superconductor interact.

Now a collaboration of researchers from Princeton University, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan has used Scanning Tunneling Microscopy to investigate for the first time how this happens on the nanoscale. As they warmed a superconducting sample, they saw that superconductivity died out at different temperatures in regions just a few nanometers apart. Superconductivity didn't just depend on the characteristics of the local region, but on what was going on nearby. Regions of stronger superconductivity seemed to help regions of weaker superconductivity survive at higher temperatures.

Researchers might exploit this interplay by micromanaging a superconductor's structure, so that regions of strong superconductivity have the maximum benefit to weak regions, potentially resulting in a new material that's superconducting at a higher overall temperature than is possible with randomly arranged ceramic superconductors.


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Physical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Colin V. Parker, Aakash Pushp, Abhay N. Pasupathy, Kenjiro K. Gomes, Jinsheng Wen, Zhijun Xu, Shimpei Ono, Genda Gu, and Ali Yazdani. Nanoscale Proximity Effect in the High-Temperature Superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2010; 104: 117001 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.117001
  2. Jennifer E. Hoffman. Proximity to understanding the cuprates. Physics, 2010; 3 (23) DOI: 10.1103/Physics.3.23

Cite This Page:

American Physical Society. "Controlling structure on the nanoscale could lead to better superconductors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315091305.htm>.
American Physical Society. (2010, March 16). Controlling structure on the nanoscale could lead to better superconductors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315091305.htm
American Physical Society. "Controlling structure on the nanoscale could lead to better superconductors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315091305.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

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