Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Studies provide more support for health benefits of coffee

Date:
March 15, 2010
Source:
American Society for Nutrition
Summary:
Multitudes of people worldwide begin each day with a cup of steaming hot coffee. Although it is sometimes referred to as "the devil's brew," coffee contains several nutrients (e.g., calcium) as well as hundreds of potentially biologically active compounds (e.g., polyphenols) that may promote health.

Multitudes of people worldwide begin each day with a cup of steaming hot coffee. Although it is sometimes referred to as "the devil's brew," coffee contains several nutrients (eg, calcium) as well as hundreds of potentially biologically active compounds (eg, polyphenols) that may promote health. For instance, observational studies have suggested a beneficial link between coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes.

Determining whether or not this association is causative, however, requires controlled intervention trials.

Two articles published in the April 2010 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition report results of two studies conducted to lend additional information concerning the potential health benefits of coffee. These studies provide additional support for the emerging health benefits of coffee. Rigorous clinical intervention trials will be needed to understand more fully the biological mechanisms.

The studies by Kempf and Sartorelli "add to a growing literature suggesting that my steaming cup of morning coffee might help me stay healthy," said ASN Spokesperson Shelley McGuire, PhD. "I'm a research scientist, but I still trust that foods and beverages which have been part of our culture for generations are probably good for us, or at least they're probably not bad for us in moderation! Of particular interest is the well-controlled clinical trial that suggests coffee can lower chronic inflammation and even raise our 'good' cholesterol. I for one will enjoy my coffee even more in the weeks to come."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Nutrition. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Kempf et al. Effects of coffee consumption on subclinical inflammation and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a clinical trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28548
  2. Sartorelli et al. Differential effects of coffee on the risk of type 2 diabetes according to meal consumption in a French cohort of women: the E3N/EPIC cohort study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2010; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28741

Cite This Page:

American Society for Nutrition. "Studies provide more support for health benefits of coffee." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315144814.htm>.
American Society for Nutrition. (2010, March 15). Studies provide more support for health benefits of coffee. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315144814.htm
American Society for Nutrition. "Studies provide more support for health benefits of coffee." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100315144814.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins