Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Bacteria in household dust may help or hinder childhood asthma

Date:
April 18, 2010
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
Bacterial populations found in household dust may determine whether or not a child living in that home develops asthma, according to new research.

Bacterial populations found in household dust may determine whether or not a child living in that home develops asthma, according to research published in the April 2010 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Recent studies have shown household dust to be a source of highly diverse and abundant bacteria, yet it remains largely unexplored. In the study, testing on samples of collected house dust demonstrated that bacterial populations are greatly impacted by the presence of dogs and cats and whether or not children attend day care. Additionally, dust samples collected from homes of infants, with or without pets and varying day care attendance, showed differences in dust bacteria were linked with asthma development in children

"These results provide the first evidence that the dominant bacterial populations in household dust are significantly influenced by environmental variables such as domestic animals and day care attendance," say the researchers. "Further, the dominant bacterial populations are significantly correlated to asthma-related outcomes, supporting the hypothesis that the types of microorganisms present in homes in early life may play key roles in the development of childhood asthma."

Asthma has risen drastically in the last decade and some are attributing the increase to an altered immune response triggered by exposure to evolving microbial communities. Farms and day care centers are associated with asthma prevention due to high levels of microbial exposure, while actions that reduce bacterial populations in the home may actually increase allergy development.

"These parallels suggest that unidentified differences in exposure to microbial communities in the industrialized world may have fundamentally changed human immune responses, thereby enhancing susceptibility to autoimmune and allergic diseases," say the researchers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R.M. Maier, M.W. Palmer, G.L. Andersen, M.J. Halonen, K.C. Josephson, R.S. Maier, F.D. Martinez, J.W. Neilson, D.A. Stern, D. Vercelli, A.L. Wright. Environmental Determinants of and Impact on Childhood Asthma by the Bacterial Community in Household Dust. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2010; 76 (8): 2663 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.01665-09

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Bacteria in household dust may help or hinder childhood asthma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415134254.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2010, April 18). Bacteria in household dust may help or hinder childhood asthma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415134254.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Bacteria in household dust may help or hinder childhood asthma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415134254.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) After four months in the hospital, the first quintuplets to be born at Baylor University Medical Center head home. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) A U.S. aid worker infected with Ebola while working in West Africa will be treated in a high security ward at Emory University in Atlanta. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins