Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

High doses of B vitamins associated with increased decline in kidney function for patients with kidney disease from diabetes

Date:
April 30, 2010
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Patients with diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease caused by diabetes) who received high dose B-vitamin therapy experienced a more rapid decline in kidney function and had a higher rate of heart attack and stroke than patients who received placebo, according to a study.

Patients with diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease caused by diabetes) who received high dose B-vitamin therapy experienced a more rapid decline in kidney function and had a higher rate of heart attack and stroke than patients who received placebo, according to a study in the April 28 issue of JAMA.

Diabetic nephropathy typically affects the network of tiny blood vessels in the glomerulus, a key structure in the kidney composed of capillary blood vessels, which is necessary for the filtration of the blood. "In addition to the personal burden, the societal burden of diabetic nephropathy is enormous, exceeding U.S. $10 billion in annual medical expenditures. Despite effective therapies to slow disease progression, approximately 40 percent of the estimated 21 million patients with diabetes in the United States develop overt nephropathy. New treatment approaches to this problem are needed," the authors write.

According to background information in the article, several observational studies have shown a significant association between high concentrations of plasma total homocysteine and the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and vascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack) and stroke. B-vitamin therapy (folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12) has been shown to lower the plasma concentration of homocysteine.

Andrew A. House, M.D., of the University of Western Ontario, and J. David Spence, M.D., of the Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, and colleagues conducted a study to examine whether B-vitamin therapy would slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy and prevent vascular events in 238 patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes. The randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted at five university medical centers in Canada between May 2001 and July 2007. Patients received single tablet of B vitamins containing folic acid (2.5 mg/d), vitamin B6 (25 mg/d), and vitamin B12 (1 mg/d), or matching placebo. The primary outcome was change in radionuclide glomerular filtration rate (GFR; a measure of kidney function) between baseline and 36 months. Other outcomes included dialysis and a composite of heart attack, stroke, revascularization and all-cause death. Plasma total homocysteine was measured. Participants were followed-up for an average of 31.9 months.

Among the results, the researchers found that participants assigned to the B-vitamin group had a greater decrease in radionuclide GFR (and subsequently poorer kidney function) compared with the placebo group. Also, participants randomized to receive B vitamins had a significantly greater number of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, with the 36-month risk of a composite outcome, including heart attack, stroke, revascularization, and all-cause mortality that was double in the B-vitamin group, compared to the placebo group. There was no difference in requirement of dialysis.

Regarding plasma total homocysteine levels, at 36 months, participants in the B-vitamin group had an average decrease while participants in the placebo group had an average increase.

"Given the recent large-scale clinical trials showing no treatment benefit, and our trial demonstrating harm, it would be prudent to discourage the use of high-dose B vitamins as a homocysteine-lowering strategy outside the framework of properly conducted clinical research," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrew A. House; Misha Eliasziw; Daniel C. Cattran; David N. Churchill; Matthew J. Oliver; Adrian Fine; George K. Dresser; J. David Spence. Effect of B-Vitamin Therapy on Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA, 2010; 303 (16): 1603-1609 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "High doses of B vitamins associated with increased decline in kidney function for patients with kidney disease from diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100427171752.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2010, April 30). High doses of B vitamins associated with increased decline in kidney function for patients with kidney disease from diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100427171752.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "High doses of B vitamins associated with increased decline in kidney function for patients with kidney disease from diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100427171752.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins