Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Quality-of-life testing may predict malignancy and survival in patients with pancreatic disease

Date:
May 3, 2010
Source:
Henry Ford Health System
Summary:
Quality-of-life measures used routinely to assess treatment outcomes for patients with pancreatic disease may be used to predict both malignancy and survival for those patients, according to a new study. Researchers found that pre-treatment quality-of-life scores could predict malignancy in patients with pancreatic lesions and survival in those who are found to have malignancies.

Quality-of-life measures used routinely to assess treatment outcomes for patients with pancreatic disease may be used to predict both malignancy and survival for those patients, according to a study by Henry Ford Hospital.

Researchers found that pre-treatment quality-of-life scores could predict malignancy in patients with pancreatic lesions and survival in those who are found to have malignancies.

"Our findings suggest that pretreatment quality-of-life scores may show which patients will have a poor survival and therefore could avoid aggressive, but futile, treatment," says Vic Velanovich, M.D., chief of General Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital and lead author of the study.

Study results was presented May 3 at the Digestive Diseases Week conference in New Orleans.

The study assessed 323 surgical patients with pancreatic lesions who completed the SF-36, a short-form health survey which contains eight domains measuring quality of life including physical functioning, role-physical, role-emotional, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, social functioning, and general health.

Patients with pain related to known chronic pancreatitis were excluded, however, patients with undiagnosed solid or cystic lesions were included. Of those patients, 210 were found to have malignancies.

"Patients with pancreatic malignancies had lower scores than patients with benign pancreatic disease," says Dr. Velanovich. "Patients with non-cancerous lesions were found to have better overall functioning than those with malignancies."

Patients with malignancies surviving less than one year had lower scores, even after controlling for the stage of their disease.

Dr. Velanovich explains that the lower scores may reflect more advanced disease or frailties which identify patients with poor prognoses.

"We were even able to predict from which patients we would be able to surgically remove the cancer entirely and from which patients we would not," says Dr. Velanovich. "Additional studies are needed to confirm whether quality-of-life measures are a reliable way to determine if patients should seek alternative treatment and when to abandon aggressive treatments."

The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach and in front of the spine that produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems including pancreatitis, an inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic cancer. In 2009, an estimated 42,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer and 35,000 deaths were reported, according to the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Henry Ford Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Henry Ford Health System. "Quality-of-life testing may predict malignancy and survival in patients with pancreatic disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100503090143.htm>.
Henry Ford Health System. (2010, May 3). Quality-of-life testing may predict malignancy and survival in patients with pancreatic disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100503090143.htm
Henry Ford Health System. "Quality-of-life testing may predict malignancy and survival in patients with pancreatic disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100503090143.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins