Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Temperature and humidity may effect virus survival on surfaces

Date:
May 17, 2010
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
The SARS coronavirus (CoV) may survive on surfaces for days at temperature and humidity levels common to indoor environments, say researchers.

The SARS coronavirus (CoV) may survive on surfaces for days at temperature and humidity levels common to indoor environments, say researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

They report their findings in the May 2010 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

During the worldwide outbreak of SARS-CoV in 2003 hospital surfaces were examined for their role in the spread of the virus following large numbers of cases being reported in health care workers, patients, and visitors to health care facilities. Surface sampling revealed SARS-CoV on surfaces and inanimate objects suggesting a possible source of transmission. The role that environmental factors, such as air temperature and relative humidity play in surface survival is important for risk assessment and the development of control measures.

Considered a biosafety hazard, only specially trained personnel are permitted to work with SARS-CoV under strict laboratory containment conditions. Two surrogate animal coronaviruses, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), were studied at various temperature and humidity levels to determine their survival rate on stainless steel. Inactivation of the virus occurred most rapidly at extremely hot temperatures and high humidity levels. When exposed to temperature and humidity levels more typical of indoor environments, the viruses could persist on surfaces for up to 28 days.

"When high numbers of viruses are deposited, TGEV and MHV may survive for days on surfaces at air temperatures and relative humidity typical of indoor environments," say the researchers. "TGEV and MHV could serve as conservative surrogates for modeling exposure, the risk of transmission, and control measures for pathogenic enveloped viruses, such as SARS-CoV and influenza virus, on health care surfaces."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Casanova et al. Effects of Air Temperature and Relative Humidity on Coronavirus Survival on Surfaces. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2010; 76 (9): 2712 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.02291-09

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Temperature and humidity may effect virus survival on surfaces." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100514123500.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2010, May 17). Temperature and humidity may effect virus survival on surfaces. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100514123500.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Temperature and humidity may effect virus survival on surfaces." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100514123500.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) — The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

Sharks Off the Menu and on the Tourist Trail in Palau

AFP (Sep. 2, 2014) — Tourists in Palau clamour to dive with sharks thanks to a pioneering conservation initiative -- as the island nation plans to completely ban commercial fishing in its vast ocean territory. 01:15 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins