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Nanotech breath sensor detects diabetes and potentially serious complication

Date:
May 20, 2010
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of a sensor that can instantly tell whether someone has type I diabetes. It could also be used by emergency room doctors to determine whether a patient has developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially serious complication that happens when diabetics do not take enough insulin. Someday the technology may also be used by diabetics, in their own homes, to determine whether they need more insulin.

Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of a sensor that can instantly tell whether someone has Type I diabetes. It could also be used by emergency room doctors to determine whether a patient has developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially serious complication that happens when diabetics do not take enough insulin. Someday the technology may also be used by diabetics, in their own homes, to determine whether they need more insulin.

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A report on the sensor appears in ACS' Analytical Chemistry.

Professor Sotiris E. Pratsinis and colleagues at ETH Zurich in Switzerland explain that everyone has a little bit of acetone in their breath. But people with Type I diabetes release unusually high levels of the chemical when they exhale. If they have diabetic ketoacidosis, a dangerous buildup of acetone in the blood, they exhale even-larger amounts of acetone.

Pratsinis' team built an extremely sensitive acetone detector by directly depositing from a flame plume a thin film of semiconducting, mixed ceramic nanoparticles between a set of gold electrodes. The device acts like an electrical resistor. When it gets hit with a puff of acetone-filled air, its resistance drops, allowing more electricity to pass between the electrodes. If a diabetic were to breathe on the sensor, its resistance would suddenly drop. When a healthy person exhales onto the nanoparticles, their resistance will not change very much. Pratsinis' team found this new sensor can detect acetone in extremely moist air, an attribute that is critical for any breath test. It is sensitive enough to detect acetone at 20 parts per billion, a concentration that is 90 times lower than the level at which it can be found in the breath of diabetic patients.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Righettoni et al. Si:WO3 Sensors for Highly Selective Detection of Acetone for Easy Diagnosis of Diabetes by Breath Analysis. Analytical Chemistry, 2010; 82 (9): 3581 DOI: 10.1021/ac902695n

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Nanotech breath sensor detects diabetes and potentially serious complication." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520102921.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2010, May 20). Nanotech breath sensor detects diabetes and potentially serious complication. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520102921.htm
American Chemical Society. "Nanotech breath sensor detects diabetes and potentially serious complication." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520102921.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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