Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Long sleep duration linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in older adults

Date:
June 10, 2010
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
Participants reporting a daily sleep duration of eight hours or more including naps were 15 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome. This relationship remained unchanged after full adjustment for potential confounders. Participants who reported a short sleep duration of less than six hours initially were 14 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome; this association disappeared after controlling for potential confounders. Participants were 29,310 people 50 years of age or older in Guangzhou, China.

Long sleep duration is associated with an elevated prevalence of metabolic syndrome in older adults, according to a research abstract presented June 8, 2010, in San Antonio, Texas, at SLEEP 2010, the 24th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.

Results indicate that participants who reported a habitual daily sleep duration of eight hours or more including naps were 15 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome (odds ratio = 1.15). This relationship remained unchanged after full adjustment for potential confounders such as demographics, lifestyle and sleep habits, and metabolic markers. Removing participants with potential ill health from the analysis slightly attenuated the observed association (OR = 1.13). Although participants who reported a short sleep duration of less than six hours were 14 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome in the initial analysis(OR = 1.14), this association disappeared after controlling for potential confounders (OR = 0.98).

"The most surprising aspect of our study was that long sleep -- and not short sleep -- was related to the presence of the metabolic syndrome," said lead author Teresa Arora, research scientist at the University of Birmingham School of Medicine in Birmingham, U.K.

The study involved 29,310 people in Guangzhou, China, making it the largest study to assess the relationship between sleep duration and the presence of metabolic syndrome. Participants were 50 years of age or older. Total sleep duration was reported by questionnaire.

The authors cautioned that the cross-sectional nature of the study did not allow for a determination of causality. However, Arora pointed out that the secondary analysis of healthy elders makes the results particularly intriguing.

"Long sleep duration is unlikely to be the consequence of ill health in our population sample as we re-ran the analysis in a smaller subset of 'healthy' elders, and the findings remained," she said. "Our follow-up data will allow us to make causal inferences."

Confirming that long sleep duration causes an increased risk of metabolic syndrome would have important public health implications, Arora added.

"We can recommend that long sleepers reduce the amount of overall sleep they achieve, which may in turn have beneficial effects on their health," she said. "Programs can be developed to modify sleep in an attempt to reduce the health burden on elderly populations, who are already at higher risk of disease."

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, metabolic syndrome is a group of obesity-related risk factors that increases your risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke. A person with at least three of these five risk factors is considered to have metabolic syndrome: excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and high blood sugar.

A U.K. study published in the February issue of the journal Sleep suggested that healthy older adults without sleep disorders can expect to have a reduced "sleep need" and to be less sleepy during the day than healthy young adults. In the May issue of Sleep a study of 15,638 older Chinese adults reported that their weighted average daily sleep time was about 7.5 hours including naps.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Long sleep duration linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in older adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608091846.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2010, June 10). Long sleep duration linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in older adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608091846.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Long sleep duration linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in older adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608091846.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins