Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Training eye movement may reduce driver distraction

Date:
June 15, 2010
Source:
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Summary:
More than 16 people are killed and more than 1,300 people are injured each day in crashes involving a distracted driver, a phenomenon that could be reduced with the right application of motion information and appropriate eye movements. Two new studies found that these factors can be beneficial to teaching people how to track objects without getting distracted or confused.

More than 16 people are killed and more than 1,300 people are injured each day in crashes involving a distracted driver, a phenomenon that could be reduced with the right application of motion information and appropriate eye movements.

Related Articles


Two studies conducted at Vanderbilt University and published in the Journal of Vision found that these factors can be beneficial to teaching people how to track objects without getting distracted or confused.

"The question is how to get people to see more, respond faster and be able to avoid errors that come from losing track of targets," explains author Adriane Seiffert, assistant professor of the Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University.

In the first study, "Conflicting motion information impairs multiple object tracking," researchers used specialized displays to test specific hypotheses about how people use motion perception to track objects. The team of researchers expected that people would use both the speed and the direction of motion for accurate tracking. However, they found that people primarily used direction.

Participants in the second study, "Looking at the center of the targets helps multiple object tracking," were required to keep track of a subset of several identical moving objects in three different experiments. The first two experiments showed that participants commonly looked at the center of the group of the moving targets, while making repetitive glances to specific targets, a strategy called center-target switching. The third experiment measured the tracking accuracy of two different strategies, center-target switching and target-looking. The accuracy was defined by the percentage of trials in which all targets were correctly identified.

According to Seiffert, the results revealed that people are better at keeping track of multiple objects when they gaze at the center of the group of targets. Looking at the center improved tracking performance compared to using the target-looking strategy.

"This may be counter-intuitive, because looking at each of the targets themselves may seem like the best strategy," said Seiffert. "This could have important repercussions for how people are trained to drive. A better understanding of how the pattern of eye movements can reduce errors in tracking could help develop strategies for reducing crash risks."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Rebecca St.Clair. Conflicting motion information impairs multiple object tracking. Journal of Vision, 2010; 10 (4): 1 DOI: 10.1167/10.4.18
  2. Hilda M. Fehd. Looking at the center of the targets helps multiple object tracking. Journal of Vision, 2010; 10 (4): 1 DOI: 10.1167/10.4.19

Cite This Page:

Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. "Training eye movement may reduce driver distraction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608092110.htm>.
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. (2010, June 15). Training eye movement may reduce driver distraction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608092110.htm
Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. "Training eye movement may reduce driver distraction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100608092110.htm (accessed November 25, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) — Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins