Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, French study finds

Date:
June 18, 2010
Source:
European League Against Rheumatism
Summary:
Systemic lupus erythematosus patients from Brazil and rheumatoid arthritis patients from France report that their rheumatic conditions negatively affect their emotional relationships and sex lives, according to new research. Furthermore, findings of the French study specifically revealed a strong correlation between RA disease severity and impact on sex life.

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients from Brazil and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from France report that their rheumatic conditions negatively affect their emotional relationships and sex lives, according to research presented at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, Italy. Furthermore, findings of the French study specifically revealed a strong correlation between RA disease severity and impact on sex life.

Results of a French study of 1,271 patients (average age 64, 98% receiving treatment) showed that 66% of patients reported that their RA symptoms had negatively impacted their sexual relationships, and 40% reported RA was the sole reason for not being sexually active. For sexually active patients, the main physical problems reported in the RA study were a decrease or absence of libido, reported by 47%, and pain or stiffness in the joints reported by 24%. A mean Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ*) score of 1.23 was reported by participants, indicating that RA had a moderate to severe level of impact on their physical functioning.

The study findings also showed that in addition to physical problems, significant emotional consequences were experienced with 39% of RA patients reporting feelings of guilt and frustration. Despite the high physical and emotional impact of RA on their sexual activity, 72% of participants said that they had never talked about the affect of the condition on their sex lives with their physician, with 66% unwilling to address the issue and 62% not considering they needed any help.

"Our study has shown that there is a link between rheumatic disease activity and the negative impact this has on the sex lives of many of our patients," said Professor Gisela Kobelt, Health Economist, Visiting Professor at Lund University, Sweden and President of Rheumatology, Association Nationale de Dιfense contre l'Arthrite Rhumatoοde (ANDAR), Paris, France and lead author of the French study. "What is worrying is that patients are often reluctant to speak to their doctor about this, which means they continue to suffer both physically and emotionally. We encourage doctors to initiate conversations with patients to offer support to those that may benefit."

The results of a separate study of 125 Brazilian women, all of whom were receiving treatment for SLE (mean age 32 years, 52.8% of SLE group married vs 27.5% of controls) showed statistically significant differences between sexual activities reported between patients with SLE and healthy controls including: absence of sexual activity (31.2% vs. 12.5% respectively (p=<0.05)), absence of arousal during sex (58.4% vs. 17.5% (p=<0.05)) and absence of orgasm (67.2% vs. 22.5% respectively (p=<0.05)).

Study designs and key statistics

In the French study, 1,271 (38%) of patients responded to a pre-tested questionnaire distributed to all members of ANDAR, a national RA patient association. The research team collated information on current treatments with 98% of patients receiving treatment at the time of survey, 41% of whom were receiving biological therapies. Twenty percent of patients scored ≤2 in the Health Assessment Questionnaire*, indicating a high impact on health was associated with the condition).

In the Brazilian study, 165 women with SLE registered at the Rheumatology Unit of the State University of Campinas, Brazil, were asked to fill out the Short Personal Experiences Questionnaire (SpeQ) anonymously. Responses were compared against those from 40 healthy women, matched by age, education and socio-economic status. Seventy-five percent of women approached completed the questionnaire, with a mean age of 32 years for the SLE group and 30 years for the control group. Fifty-two percent of patients with SLE reported having current sexual partners vs. 92.5% of controls (p=<0.05) with 32.8% of SLE patients reporting being currently single vs. 72.5% of controls. Abstract Numbers: FRI0131 & AB0411

* Note: HAQ (health assessment questionnaire) is a disability index used by physicians to measure an individual's physical functioning. It assesses ability to undertake everyday activities such as dressing, eating and walking, and whether assistance from another person or disability aids is required. A higher score indicates greater disability.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European League Against Rheumatism. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European League Against Rheumatism. "Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, French study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100618081335.htm>.
European League Against Rheumatism. (2010, June 18). Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, French study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100618081335.htm
European League Against Rheumatism. "Sex lives of patients are negatively affected by rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, French study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100618081335.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) — Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden laid out new guidelines for health care workers when dealing with the deadly Ebola virus including new precautions when taking off personal protective equipment. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins