Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Amniotic membrane used to repair human articular cartilage

Date:
June 23, 2010
Source:
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology
Summary:
Spanish scientists have proposed using human amniotic membrane as a new tool for repairing damaged human articular cartilage, which heals very poorly because of its low capacity for self-repair. Their research shows that the cellular density of the cartilage synthesized could be greater than that of the body's own natural cartilage.

Osteoarthritis is characterized by impairment of cartilage and subchondral bone. In this image, an example of damaged knee cartilage is shown.
Credit: Kristie Wells

Spanish scientists have analyzed the teeth of almost all species of hominids that have existed during the past four million years. Thus, they achieved to identify Neanderthal features in ancient European populations. Dental fossils suggest that the separation occurred at least a million years ago, while DNA-based analyses suggest that this occurred much later.

"The objective was to evaluate the utility of cryo-preserved human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a support for repairing human articular cartilage injuries, which have a very limited capacity for self-healing," says Francisco J. Blanco, lead author of the study and a researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research of La Coruña (INIBIC).

The results, which have been published in the journal Cell and Tissue Banking, show that cryo-preserved HAM is useful as a scaffold for growing human chondrocytes in cell therapy and for repairing human cartilage injuries. "It provides a more regular surface and fills in the cavities and fissures," explains Blanco.

The authors cultivated the chondrocytes (cells that form part of the cartilaginous tissue), isolated from human articular cartilage, on the amniotic membrane over a period of three and four weeks. The amniotic membranes were used to develop 44 repair models of arthritic human articular cartilage in vitro, which was assessed between four and 16 weeks later.

The HAM also bonds well with the native cartilage. "In some models, we could not differentiate between where the native tissue stopped and the neo-synthesised tissue began," says the expert. This tissue had a fibrous appearance and high cellular density (cellularity), which in some cases was greater than that of the actual native cartilage.

The use of differentiated chondrocytes is a useful therapeutic option for repairing articular cartilage injuries. However, there are limitations to implanting these cells, since many patients will be ruled out due to their lack of healthy chondrocytes, and this technique also causes additional damage to the joint.

"Transplanting chondrocytes cultivated on different natural or synthetic 'scaffolds' is used today in cell tissue engineering. The HAM has sparked great interest over recent years, above all in the field of regenerative medicine," concludes Blanco.

Clinical solutions to osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major articular pathology that is characterised by alteration of the cartilage and the bone that supports it, the subchondral bone. As the current pharmacological and surgical treatments have only palliative effects, cell therapy is a new clinical approach for repairing damaged or destroyed tissues.

HAM has many clinical advantages as a support -- it is an anti-microbial, anti-angiogenic, anti-tumour tissue, which reduces inflammation and pain and improves scarring. In addition, the amnios of the HAM has no immune response, meaning there are no risks associated with transplanting it, and it contains many of the components of natural cartilage.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Silvia Díaz-Prado, Mª Esther Rendal-Vázquez, Emma Muiños-López, Tamara Hermida-Gómez, Margarita Rodríguez-Cabarcos, Isaac Fuentes-Boquete, Francisco J. Toro, Francisco J. Blanco. Potential use of the human amniotic membrane as a scaffold in human articular cartilage repair. Cell and Tissue Banking, 2010; 11 (2): 183 DOI: 10.1007/s10561-009-9144-1

Cite This Page:

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology. "Amniotic membrane used to repair human articular cartilage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100623104430.htm>.
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology. (2010, June 23). Amniotic membrane used to repair human articular cartilage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100623104430.htm
FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology. "Amniotic membrane used to repair human articular cartilage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100623104430.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) — Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) — California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins