Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Help is on the phone: Reducing pain and depression of cancer

Date:
July 13, 2010
Source:
Indiana University School of Medicine
Summary:
Pain and depression associated with cancer -- symptoms often unrecognized and undertreated -- can be significantly reduced through centralized telephone-based care management coupled with automated symptom monitoring, according to researchers.

Pain and depression associated with cancer -- symptoms often unrecognized and undertreated -- can be significantly reduced through centralized telephone-based care management coupled with automated symptom monitoring, according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine.

The Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression (INCPAD) study combined automated calls with follow-up calls from the nurse care manager to reduce pain and depression in cancer patients. Calls were made to individuals with all types of cancers seen by rural and urban community-based oncology physicians.

The improved outcomes of the patients who received the telephone-based care management and the feasibility of this approach is reported in the July 14, 2010, issue of the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA).

"Because oncologists are busy with testing, chemotherapy and other treatments, they often have too little time left for quality of life issues, like pain and depression. We felt one solution might be a partnership between a telephone-based symptom management team and community-based oncology practices. We found that an economical, centralized approach is feasible to conduct and significantly improved symptoms of both depression and pain in patients in any phase of cancer from newly diagnosed to long term to recurrent to cancer free," said Kurt Kroenke, M.D., the study's principal investigator. Dr. Kroenke is a Regenstrief Institute investigator and an IU School of Medicine professor of medicine.

An INCPAD nurse manager reviewed the data collected from the automated symptom monitoring phone calls that, for example, instructed the patients to rate their depression and pain on scales of 1 to 10. This data allowed the nurse's phone contacts to be more efficient by targeting areas needing attention. Although most study participants, whose average age was 59, elected automated surveillance calls, they also were offered an option to participate online in this aspect of the study.

"Technology, in the form of automated calls repeated until an adequate treatment response occurred, allowed us to gather data on symptom severity at a time convenient for the patient, making the process very patient-centered. It also allowed the nurse manager to work at a higher level to improve the quality of life of these cancer patients. And it gave these patients, many of whom lived in underserved rural areas, one stop assistance they probably wouldn't have had access to unless they went to a major cancer center," said Dr. Kroenke, who is a research scientist with the Center for Implementing Evidence-Based Practice at the Richard Roudebush VA Medical Center and an Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center member.

INCPAD enrolled 405 cancer patients, including 178 with both depression and pain, 131 with depression only and 96 with pain only. Patients who participated in the study were randomized to usual care or telephone-based case management.

In addition to Dr. Kroenke, co-authors of "Effect of Telecare Management on Pain and Depression in Patients with Cancer: A Randomized Trial," are Dale Theobald, M.D., of Community Cancer Care and the Community Health Network; Jingwei Wu, M.S., of the IU School of Medicine; Kelli Norton, B.S., of the Regenstrief Institute; Gwendolyn Morrison, Ph.D., of the Regenstrief Institute and the IU School of Liberal Arts; Janet Carpenter, Ph.D., R.N., of the IU School of Nursing; and Wanzhu Tu, Ph.D., of the Regenstrief Institute and the IU School of Medicine.

The study was supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kurt Kroenke; Dale Theobald; Jingwei Wu; Kelli Norton; Gwendolyn Morrison; Janet Carpenter; Wanzhu Tu. Effect of Telecare Management on Pain and Depression in Patients With Cancer: A Randomized Trial. JAMA, 2010; 304 (2): 163-171 [link]

Cite This Page:

Indiana University School of Medicine. "Help is on the phone: Reducing pain and depression of cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100713165015.htm>.
Indiana University School of Medicine. (2010, July 13). Help is on the phone: Reducing pain and depression of cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100713165015.htm
Indiana University School of Medicine. "Help is on the phone: Reducing pain and depression of cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100713165015.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Research from Washington University suggest people with conscientious spouses have greater career success. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Researchers say certain markers in the blood can predict risk of psychosis later in the life. The test can aid in early treatment for the condition. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

AP (Sep. 25, 2014) Teri Tacheny, a harpist, has a loyal following of fans who appreciate her soothing music. Every month, gorillas, orangutans and monkeys amble down to hear her play at the Como Park Zoo in Minnesota. (Sept. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins