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Toward a new generation of superplastics

Date:
July 25, 2010
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting an in-depth validation of the discovery of the world's first mass producible, low-cost, organoclays for plastics. The powdered material, made from natural clay, would be a safer, more environmentally friendly replacement for the compound widely used to make plastics nanocomposites.

A substance made from natural clay (shown), the material used to make pottery, may be spinning its way toward use as an inexpensive, eco-friendly replacement for a compound widely used to make plastic nanocomposites.
Credit: iStockphoto/Henry Chaplin

Scientists are reporting an in-depth validation of the discovery of the world's first mass producible, low-cost, organoclays for plastics. The powdered material, made from natural clay, would be a safer, more environmentally friendly replacement for the compound widely used to make plastics nanocomposites.

A report on the research appears in ACS' Macromolecules, a bi-weekly journal.

Miriam Rafailovich and colleagues focused on a new organoclay developed and patented by a team of scientists headed by David Abecassis. The scientists explain that so-called quaternary amine-treated organoclays have been pioneering nanoparticles in the field of plastics nanotechnology. Just small amounts of the substances make plastics flame retardant, stronger, and more resistant to damage from ultraviolet light and chemicals. They also allow plastics to be mixed together into hybrid materials from plastics that otherwise would not exist.

However, quaternary amine organoclays are difficult to produce because of the health and environmental risks associated with quaternary amines, as well as the need to manufacture them in small batches. These and other disadvantages, including high cost, limit use of the materials.

The new organoclay uses resorcinol diphenyl phosphate (which is normally a flame retardant), to achieve mass producible organoclays which can be made in continuous processing. In addition these organoclays are cheaper, generate less dust, and are thermostable to much higher temperatures (beyond 600 degrees Fahrenheit). This clay has also been proven to be superior for flame retardance applications. In addition, unlike most quaternary amine based organoclays, it works well in styrene plastics, one of the most widely used kinds of plastic.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Seongchan Pack, Takashi Kashiwagi, Changhong Cao, Chad S. Korach, Menachem Lewin, Miriam H. Rafailovich. Role of Surface Interactions in the Synergizing Polymer/Clay Flame Retardant Properties. Macromolecules, 2010; 43 (12): 5338 DOI: 10.1021/ma100669g

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Toward a new generation of superplastics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100721133221.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2010, July 25). Toward a new generation of superplastics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100721133221.htm
American Chemical Society. "Toward a new generation of superplastics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100721133221.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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