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Cheaper substrates made of oxide materials

Date:
July 27, 2010
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Imagine building cheaper electronics on a variety of substrates -- materials like plastic, paper, or fabric. Researchers in Taiwan have made a discovery that opens this door, allowing them to build electronic components like diodes on many different substrates.

Imagine building cheaper electronics on a variety of substrates -- materials like plastic, paper, or fabric. Researchers at Taiwan's National Chiao Tung University have made a discovery that opens this door, allowing them to build electronic components like diodes on many different substrates.

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They describe their findings in the journal Applied Physics Letters, published by the American Institute of Physics.

"Rectifying diodes are the fundamental building blocks in electronics," says Tuo-Hung Hou, describing the research. "Diodes made of oxide materials instead of traditional silicon are especially interesting because they can be fabricated at room temperature, as opposed to the 1,000 C typically required for silicon diodes. Besides complex materials engineering, our work shows a new route to greatly improve the rectification efficiency of oxide diodes by forming nanoscale current paths in oxides."

An extra bonus, Hou adds, is that by carefully controlling the nanoscale paths, they can create either a resistive nonvolatile memory, so-called "RRAM," or a rectifying diode in the same structure. RRAM simply consists of a layer of transition metal oxides sandwiched between two metal electrodes and is being actively pursued by many companies as the next "big thing" in memory.

The researchers hope their continued work will yield a new generation of electronic circuits made entirely of oxide materials.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jiun-Jia Huang, Chih-Wei Kuo, Wei-Chen Chang, Tuo-Hung Hou. Transition of stable rectification to resistive-switching in Ti/TiO2/Pt oxide diode. Applied Physics Letters, 2010; 96 (26): 262901 DOI: 10.1063/1.3457866

Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "Cheaper substrates made of oxide materials." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727162912.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2010, July 27). Cheaper substrates made of oxide materials. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727162912.htm
American Institute of Physics. "Cheaper substrates made of oxide materials." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727162912.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

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