Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Kinked nanopores slow DNA passage for easier sequencing

Date:
August 9, 2010
Source:
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories
Summary:
In an innovation critical to improved DNA sequencing, a markedly slower transmission of DNA through nanopores has been achieved.

This image, taken by a transmission electron microscope at the University of New Mexico, shows the unique kinked nanopore array platform.
Credit: Image courtesy of DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

In an innovation critical to improved DNA sequencing, a markedly slower transmission of DNA through nanopores has been achieved by a team led by Sandia National Laboratories researchers.

Related Articles


Solid-state nanopores sculpted from silicon dioxide are generally straight, tiny tunnels more than a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. They are used as sensors to detect and characterize DNA, RNA and proteins. But these materials shoot through such holes so rapidly that sequencing the DNA passing through them, for example, is a problem.

In a paper published July 23 in Nature Materials, a team led by Sandia National Laboratories researchers reports using self-assembly techniques to fabricate equally tiny but kinked nanopores. Combined with atomic-layer deposition to modify the chemical characteristics of the nanopores, the innovations achieve a fivefold slowdown in the voltage-driven translocation speeds critically needed in DNA sequencing. (Translocation involves DNA entering and passing completely through the pores, which are only slightly wider than the DNA itself.)

"By control of pore size, length, shape and composition," says lead researcher Jeff Brinker, "we capture the main functional behaviors of protein pores in our solid-state nanopore system." The importance of a fivefold slowdown in this kind of work, Brinker says, is large.

Also of note is the technique's capability to separate single- and double-stranded DNA in an array format. "There are promising DNA sequencing technologies that require this," says Brinker.

The idea of using synthetic solid-state nanopores as single-molecule sensors for detection and characterization of DNA and its sister materials is currently under intensive investigation by researchers around the world. The thrust was inspired by the exquisite selectivity and flux demonstrated by natural biological channels. Researchers hope to emulate these behaviors by creating more robust synthetic materials more readily integrated into practical devices.

Current scientific procedures align the formation of nominally cylindrical or conical pores at right angles to a membrane surface. These are less capable of significantly slowing the passage of DNA than the kinked nanopores.

"We had a pretty simple idea," Brinker says. "We use the self-assembly approaches we pioneered to make ultrathin membranes with ordered arrays of about 3-nanometer diameter pores. We then further tune the pore size via an atomic-layer deposition process we invented. This allows us to control the pore diameter and surface chemistry at the subnanometer scale. Compared to other solid state nanopores developed to date, our system combines finer control of pore size with the development of a kinked pore pathway. In combination, these allow slowing down the DNA velocity."

The work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences and Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development office.

In addition to Brinker, participating team members include Sandians David Adams, Carter Hodges and former Sandia post-doctoral student Yingbing Jiang, with University of New Mexico (UNM) researchers Zhu Chen, Darren Dunphy, Nanguo Liu, and George Xomeritakas. Other research participants are from the UNM School of Pharmacy, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Beckman Institute and Mechanical Science and Engineering Dept., and Purdue University's School of Chemical Engineering.

Brinker is a Sandia Fellow, and Distinguished and Regent's Professor of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering and Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at UNM.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by DOE/Sandia National Laboratories. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zhu Chen, Yingbing Jiang, Darren R. Dunphy, David P. Adams, Carter Hodges, Nanguo Liu, Nan Zhang, George Xomeritakis, Xiaozhong Jin, N. R. Aluru, Steven J. Gaik, Hugh W. Hillhouse & C. Jeffrey Brinker. DNA translocation through an array of kinked nanopores. Nature Materials, 2010; DOI: 10.1038/nmat2805

Cite This Page:

DOE/Sandia National Laboratories. "Kinked nanopores slow DNA passage for easier sequencing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100730191658.htm>.
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories. (2010, August 9). Kinked nanopores slow DNA passage for easier sequencing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100730191658.htm
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories. "Kinked nanopores slow DNA passage for easier sequencing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100730191658.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Inspectors Found Faulty Work Before NYC Blast

Inspectors Found Faulty Work Before NYC Blast

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) An hour before an apparent gas explosion sent flames soaring and debris flying at a Manhattan apartment building, injuring 19 people, utility company inspectors decided the work being done there was faulty. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Facebook Building Plane-Sized Drones For Global Internet

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) Facebook on Thursday revealed more details about its Internet-connected drone project. The drone is bigger than a 737, but lighter than a car. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Robot Returns from International Space Station and Sets Two Guinness World Records

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Mar. 27, 2015) The companion robot "Kirobo" returns to earth from the International Space Station and sets two Guinness World Records. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Residents Witness Building Explosion, Collapse

Residents Witness Building Explosion, Collapse

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) Witnesses recount the sites and sounds of a massive explosion and subsequent building collapse in the heart of Manhattan&apos;s trendy East Village on Thursday. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins