Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Does cosmetic surgery help body dysmorphic disorder?

Date:
August 11, 2010
Source:
Lifespan
Summary:
A new study finds that while many who suffer from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) seek cosmetic procedures, only two percent of procedures actually reduced the severity of BDD. Despite this poor long-term outcome, physicians continue to provide requested surgeries to people suffering from BDD.

A new study finds that while many who suffer from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) seek cosmetic procedures, only two percent of procedures actually reduced the severity of BDD. Despite this poor long-term outcome, physicians continue to provide requested surgeries to people suffering from BDD. The study was recently published in Annals of Plastic Surgery.

Katharine A. Phillips, MD, is the director of the body image program at Rhode Island Hospital and a co-author of the paper. Phillips says, "BDD is a psychiatric disorder characterized by preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect in appearance which causes clinically significant distress or functional impairment. A majority of these individuals believe they have an actual deformity that can be corrected by cosmetic treatments to fix these perceived defects rather than seeking psychiatric intervention."

Phillips and her co-author, Canice Crerand, PhD, of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, reported in previous studies that BDD appears relatively common among individuals who receive cosmetic surgery, with reported rates of 7 to 8 percent in cosmetic surgery patients in the United States. Even with the high frequency of those with BDD seeking and receiving cosmetic procedures, few studies have more specifically investigated the clinical outcomes of surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic treatments, such as chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and injectable fillers).

In their new study, the researchers report that in a small retrospective study of 200 individuals with BDD, 31 percent sought and 21 percent received surgical or minimally invasive treatment for BDD symptoms. Nearly all of these individuals continued to have BDD symptoms, and some actually developed new appearance preoccupations. They also note that in a survey of 265 cosmetic surgeons, 178 (65 percent) reported treating patients with BDD, yet only one percent of the cases resulted in BDD symptom improvement. Phillips, who is also a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, says, "These findings, coupled with reports of lawsuits and occasionally violence perpetrated by persons with BDD towards physicians, have led some to believe that BDD is a contraindication for cosmetic treatment."

The researchers found that the most common surgical procedures sought were rhinoplasty and breast augmentation, while the most common minimally invasive treatments were collagen injections and microdermabrasion. Three quarters of all the requested procedures involved facial features. The findings also indicate that more than a third of patients received multiple procedures.

In terms of long-term outcomes from procedures, only 25 percent of the patients showed an improvement in their appraisal of the treated body part and showed a longer-term decreased preoccupation. However, as noted by co-author Crerand, "Only two percent of surgical or minimally invasive procedures led to longer-term improvement in overall BDD symptoms."

The researchers also found that when treatment was sought, 20 percent of the procedures were not received. Cost was the most common reason for not receiving the requested procedure (30 percent), followed by physician refusal to perform the procedure (26 percent).Their findings also indicate that physicians were significantly less likely to refuse a surgical or minimally invasive treatment than other procedures (dermatological, dental and others). Phillips says, "This suggests that many surgeons were not aware of the patient's BDD or do not consider BDD a contraindication to treatment. In a survey of 265 cosmetic surgeons, only 30 percent believed that BDD was always a contraindication to surgery."

The researchers conclude, "This study provides new and more detailed information about receipt and outcome of surgical/minimally invasive procedures, and the findings indicate that there is a clear need to further investigate this topic in prospective studies. In the meantime, physicians need to be aware that psychiatric treatments for BDD such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cognitive behavioral therapy appear to be effective for what can be a debilitating disorder."

Also involved in the study is William Menard of Alpert Medical School. The study was funded through a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Lifespan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Lifespan. "Does cosmetic surgery help body dysmorphic disorder?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100811101424.htm>.
Lifespan. (2010, August 11). Does cosmetic surgery help body dysmorphic disorder?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100811101424.htm
Lifespan. "Does cosmetic surgery help body dysmorphic disorder?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100811101424.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins