Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Why females fare better than males after traumatic injury

Date:
September 1, 2010
Source:
Scott & White Healthcare
Summary:
A new study looks at how female versus male rats fared after suffering a trauma and subsequent hemorrhagic shock who were given Estradiol (estrogen). In the study, the Estradiol prevented vascular permeability following hemorrhagic shock.

A new study looks at how female versus male rats fared after suffering a trauma and subsequent hemorrhagic shock who were given Estradiol (estrogen).

In the study, published in the September 2010 issue of Shock by Dr. Ed W. Childs and colleagues at Scott & White Healthcare, the Estradiol prevented vascular permeability following hemorrhagic shock.

"We've always known that females fare better than males after traumatic injury, but we never knew why, now we know a potential mechanism," said Ed W. Childs, M.D., professor of surgery at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and vice chairman of research in the department of surgery at Scott & White Healthcare.

"This study proved that estrogen receptors on the mitochondria of our cells actually help protect these cells on females after injury. But, if you block those estrogen receptors, they perform like those of a male."

Examples of shock can include: car accident, falls that may include a severe trauma, and any injury that causes bleeding. Shock (level IV) is defined as 40% blood volume loss and a systolic blood pressure under 90.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Scott & White Healthcare. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Childs, EW, Tharakan B, Hunter FA, Smythe WR. 17β-estradiol mediated protection against vascular leak after hemorrhagic shock: role of estrogen receptors and apoptotic signaling. Shock, 2010; 34 (3): 229-35 DOI: 10.1097/SHK.0b013e3181d75b50

Cite This Page:

Scott & White Healthcare. "Why females fare better than males after traumatic injury." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100831172128.htm>.
Scott & White Healthcare. (2010, September 1). Why females fare better than males after traumatic injury. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100831172128.htm
Scott & White Healthcare. "Why females fare better than males after traumatic injury." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100831172128.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins