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Tumor budding identified as predictor for unfavorable outcome in lung cancer

Date:
September 13, 2010
Source:
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Summary:
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and the prognosis is generally poor, even if surgery is successful. Furthermore, the incidence of one type of lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, has been increasing in recent years.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and the prognosis is generally poor, even if surgery is successful. Furthermore, the incidence of one type of lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, has been increasing in recent years. A better understanding of the changes in tumor cell biology that result in a more aggressive neoplastic phenotype (characteristic of an abnormal mass of tissue) that have been completely surgically removed may help identify patients at risk for recurrent disease and lead to the development of more effective therapeutic treatments. Tumor budding is one such characteristic that may provide insights on advancing the understanding of recurrence.

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The term tumor budding refers to single cells or small clusters of up to four cells within the stromal tissue at the invasive margin of colorectal cancers. This morphologic feature is increasingly being recognized as an adverse prognostic factor. To progress in this understanding, a study featured in the September edition of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) conducted the first study to evaluate tumor budding in adenocarcinoma of the lung.

In order to investigate the relationship between tumor budding and the prognostic significance, researchers reviewed the cases of 201 consecutive patients who had undergone complete resection of adenocarcinoma of the lung measuring ≤ 30 mm( 1.25 inches) in diameter. The presence of tumor budding was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, pathologic stage, vascular invasion, lymphatic invasion, and pleural invasion. Furthermore, the overall five-year survival rates of the group with budding and the group without budding was 67.5 and 88.3 percent, respectively, and the difference was significant.

"Overall, the pilot study identified that tumor budding is a distinct morphologic feature that has biologic and prognostic significance; moreover, the presence was identified as a significant predictor of an unfavorable outcome," explained lead investigator, Yoko Yamaguchi, MD. "Justifiably, clarification of the molecular mechanism that causes budding in lung adenocarcinoma will be important in the future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yoko Yamaguchi, Genichiro Ishii, Motohiro Kojima, Kiyotaka Yoh, Hajime Otsuka, Yoichi Otaki, Keiju Aokage, Shingo Yanagi, Kanji Nagai, Yutaka Nishiwaki, Atsushi Ochiai. Histopathologic Features of the Tumor Budding in Adenocarcinoma of the Lung. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 2010; 5 (9): 1361 DOI: 10.1097/JTO.0b013e3181eaf2f3

Cite This Page:

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Tumor budding identified as predictor for unfavorable outcome in lung cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100901072859.htm>.
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2010, September 13). Tumor budding identified as predictor for unfavorable outcome in lung cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100901072859.htm
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Tumor budding identified as predictor for unfavorable outcome in lung cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100901072859.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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