Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists unwrap DNA packaging to gain insight into cells

Date:
September 2, 2010
Source:
University of Edinburgh
Summary:
Scientists have built a clearer picture of how lengthy strands of DNA are concertinaed when our cells grow and divide, in a discovery could help explain how cell renewal can go wrong.

Scientists have built a clearer picture of how lengthy strands of DNA are concertinaed when our cells grow and divide, in a discovery could help explain how cell renewal can go wrong.

Related Articles


Scientists have identified thousands of proteins that play a key role in compacting DNA -- a crucial process by which DNA is shortened up to 10,000 times to fit inside cells as they split into two.

Researchers hope the findings could shed light on what happens when this packaging process fails and cells divide abnormally -- which can lead to cancer or cause developing embryos to miscarry.

Scientists developed a new technology for their research by combining existing techniques in biology, genetics and maths and the large-scale study of proteins. They were able to define some 4,000 proteins involved in the division of cells. The proteins protect the fragile genetic material and help it fold into the correct shape before it splits into two new cells. The new methods can identify many of those proteins that are most important to the process.

University of Edinburgh scientists, who carried out the study, hope the discovery will help them better understand how these proteins influence the process of cell division.

The research was carried out in collaboration with the University of Oxford and the Japanese National Institute of Genetics in Mishima, Japan. It was supported by the Wellcome Trust and published in the journal Cell.

Professor William Earnshaw of the University of Edinburgh's School of Biological Sciences, who directed the study with Professor Juri Rappsilber, said: "Until now, our understanding of the very complex way in which DNA moves during cell division was patchy -- this latest development allows us, for the first time, to fully identify all the proteins that take part in the process, and how they interact with one another. Future work is needed to reveal more of the intricacies of this process and how to prevent it from going wrong."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shinya Ohta, Jimi-Carlo Bukowski-Wills, Luis Sanchez-Pulido, Flavia de Lima Alves, Laura Wood, Zhuo A. Chen, Melpi Platani, Lutz Fischer, Damien F. Hudson, Chris P. Ponting, Tatsuo Fukagawa, William C. Earnshaw, Juri Rappsilber. The Protein Composition of Mitotic Chromosomes Determined Using Multiclassifier Combinatorial Proteomics. Cell, 2010; 142 (5): 810-821 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2010.07.047

Cite This Page:

University of Edinburgh. "Scientists unwrap DNA packaging to gain insight into cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902121055.htm>.
University of Edinburgh. (2010, September 2). Scientists unwrap DNA packaging to gain insight into cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902121055.htm
University of Edinburgh. "Scientists unwrap DNA packaging to gain insight into cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902121055.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Feast Your Eyes: Lamb Chop Sent Into Space from UK

Feast Your Eyes: Lamb Chop Sent Into Space from UK

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 25, 2014) Take a stab at this -- stunt video shows a lamb chop's journey from an east London restaurant over 30 kilometers into space. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins