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Nano-architectured aluminum has steely strength

Date:
September 8, 2010
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Scientists have figured out a way to make an aluminum alloy, or a mixture of aluminum and other elements, just as strong as steel.

A North Carolina State University researcher and colleagues have figured out a way to make an aluminum alloy, or a mixture of aluminum and other elements, just as strong as steel.

That's important, says Dr. Yuntian Zhu, professor of materials science and the NC State researcher involved in the project, because the search for ever lighter -- yet stronger -- materials is crucial to devising everything from more fuel-efficient cars to safer airplanes.

In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, Zhu and his colleagues describe the new nanoscale architecture within aluminum alloys that have unprecedented strength but also reasonable plasticity to stretch and not break under stress. Perhaps even more importantly, the technique of creating these nanostructures can be used on many different types of metals.

Zhu says the aluminum alloys have unique structural elements that, when combined to form a hierarchical structure at several nanoscale levels, make them super-strong and ductile.

The aluminum alloys have small building blocks, called "grains," that are thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair. Each grain is a tiny crystal less than 100 nanometers in size. Bigger is not better in materials, Zhu says, as smaller grains result in stronger materials.

Zhu also says the aluminum alloys have a number of different types of crystal "defects." Nanocrystals with defects are stronger than perfect crystals.

Now, Zhu plans on working on strengthening magnesium, a metal that is even lighter than aluminum. He's collaborating with the Department of Defense on a project to make magnesium alloys strong enough to be used as body armor for soldiers.

Zhu's colleagues on the Nature Communications paper are affiliated with the University of Sydney in Australia; the University of California, Davis; and Ufa State Aviation Technical University in Russia.

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering is part of NC State's College of Engineering.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Liddicoat et al. Nanostructural hierarchy increases the strength of aluminium alloys. Nature Communications, 2010; 1 (6): 1 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms1062

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Nano-architectured aluminum has steely strength." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908101929.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2010, September 8). Nano-architectured aluminum has steely strength. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908101929.htm
North Carolina State University. "Nano-architectured aluminum has steely strength." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908101929.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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