Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cholesterol drug may have role in treating prostate cancer

Date:
September 20, 2010
Source:
St. Michael's Hospital
Summary:
A drug commonly prescribed for people with high cholesterol may also be effective in treating prostate cancer, according to new research.

A drug commonly prescribed for people with high cholesterol may also be effective in treating prostate cancer, according to new research by Dr. Xiao-Yan Wen at St. Michael's Hospital.

Related Articles


Rosuvastatin -- a statin drug sold as Crestor -- suppressed the growth of transplanted human prostate cancer cells in mice.

"Our data provided solid pre-clinical evidence and a strong rationale for clinical trials of statins in the treatment of prostate cancer," said Wen, whose research appears in the September issue of European Urology, the journal of the European Association of Urology.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Canadian men -- one in seven men will develop the disease during his lifetime and one in 27 will die from it. Despite improvements in treatments such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, many patients still progress to advanced stages.

Recent clinical trials have shown encouraging results regarding the use of angiogenic inhibitors -- substances that prevent the growth of blood vessels that feed tumors.

Wen and his colleagues in Canada and China screened 2,000 small molecules in zebrafish embryos with 2,000 small molecules. Seven compounds -- four of them statins -- slowed or prevented the growth of those blood vessels. They then decided to investigate the cancer-fighting potential of one of those statins, rosuvastatin, and found it suppressed the growth of prostate cancer in mice without apparent side effects.

If human trials confirmed that statin drugs can optimize the benefits of radiation, that would help doctors determine the most effective, less toxic and affordable treatments for their prostate cancer patients.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by St. Michael's Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chunyang Wang, Weiyang Tao, Youdong Wang, Jennifer Bikow, Bingxin Lu, Armand Keating, Subodh Verma, Thomas G. Parker, Ruifa Han, Xiao-Yan Wen. Rosuvastatin, Identified From a Zebrafish Chemical Genetic Screen for Antiangiogenic Compounds, Suppresses the Growth of Prostate Cancer. European Urology, 2010; 58 (3): 418 DOI: 10.1016/j.eururo.2010.05.024

Cite This Page:

St. Michael's Hospital. "Cholesterol drug may have role in treating prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100920111317.htm>.
St. Michael's Hospital. (2010, September 20). Cholesterol drug may have role in treating prostate cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100920111317.htm
St. Michael's Hospital. "Cholesterol drug may have role in treating prostate cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100920111317.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins