Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Physicians beware: Cholesterol counts in kidney disease patients

Date:
September 27, 2010
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
To understand the health effects of high cholesterol levels, doctors first need to assess malnutrition and inflammation status in their chronic kidney disease patients, according to a new study.

To understand the health effects of high cholesterol levels, doctors first need to assess malnutrition and inflammation status in their chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN).

Patients with CKD often develop and die from cardiovascular disease (CVD). While it's well known that high cholesterol puts people at risk for CVD in the general population, the relationship is not so clear in CKD patients. In fact, research has shown that dialysis patients with higher cholesterol levels die at a lower rate than those with lower cholesterol levels. It's not that high cholesterol is beneficial; rather, it may indicate a lesser degree of malnutrition and inflammation, two serious and interrelated complications of kidney disease.

To see whether malnutrition and/or inflammation might modify the relationship of cholesterol and CVD, Gabriel Contreras MD MPH (University of Miami Miller School of Medicine), senior author Lawrence Appel, MD (Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Prevention, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions), and colleagues studied 990 African-Americans with hypertension and CKD who were not yet on dialysis, 31% of whom had malnutrition and/or inflammation. Over the course of 12 years, 20% of patients experienced a new CVD event such as heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, or death from heart disease, with similar numbers in the groups with (19%) and without malnutrition and/or inflammation (21%). In the patients with malnutrition and/or inflammation, high blood cholesterol levels were not associated with CVD events; however, in the patients without malnutrition and/or inflammation (69%), patients' risk of developing a new CVD event increased as cholesterol levels rose. (Compared to patients with cholesterol levels less than 200 mg/dL, patients with cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 mg/dL had a 1.19-fold increased risk; those with cholesterol levels of 240 mg/dL or more had a 2.18-fold increased risk.)

Take-away message: "In CKD patients, the inconsistent and often inverse relationship of cholesterol level with CVD and overall mortality may be explained by the presence of malnutrition and/or inflammation," said Dr. Contreras. "Whereas traditional risk factors such as elevated blood cholesterol levels remain important, they appear to compete and interact with non-traditional risk factors such as malnutrition and inflammation. Doctors caring for CKD patients should take into account the presence of malnutrition and inflammation as they interpret blood cholesterol levels." Malnutrition and/or inflammation complicate blood cholesterol readings in CKD patients, making it important that physicians investigate the causes of high or low cholesterol in their patients.

The National Institute of Health of the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension sponsored the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gabriel Contreras, Bo Hu, Brad C. Astor, Tom Greene, Thomas Erlinger, John W. Kusek, Michael Lipkowitz, Julia A. Lewis, Otelio S. Randall, Lee Hebert, Jackson T Wright Jr., Cynthia A. Kendrick, Jennifer Gassman, George Bakris, Joel D. Kopple, Lawrence J. Appel, and for the African-American Study of Kidney Disease, Hypertension Study Group. Malnutrition-Inflammation Modifies the Relationship of Cholesterol with Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of the American Society Nephrology, September 23, 2010 DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2009121285

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians beware: Cholesterol counts in kidney disease patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100923184445.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2010, September 27). Physicians beware: Cholesterol counts in kidney disease patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100923184445.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians beware: Cholesterol counts in kidney disease patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100923184445.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins