Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New method for accurate diagnosis of gall bladder cancer

Date:
October 14, 2010
Source:
University of Granada
Summary:
Scientists in Spain have successfully applied a new technique called FDG positron emission tomography scanning, which allows more accurate diagnosis and treatment of gall bladder cancer.

PET/TAC-FDG Study of a patient with suspected gall bladder cancer. Surgery confirmed that it was a malignant tumor.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Granada

Researchers a the University of Granada and the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves at Granada found that the metabolic imaging diagnosis technique -- based on the analysis of a structural analog of glucose labeled with a positron-emitting compound (18F) -- allows early diagnosis of gall bladder cancer, a relatively rare disease with high mortality rates among most patients suffering from it.

For the purpose of this study, 62 patients were subjected to this scanning method, which represents the largest sample of patients with gall bladder cancer ever studied by applying this type of technology -- called FDG positron emission tomography. The study reported excellent results, significantly better than other structural imaging methods, and enabled more accurate and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of patients, which allows to avoid unnecessary procedures.

This study was conducted by Sc.D Carlos Ramos Font and directed by professors Nicolás Olea Serrano (UGR), José Manuel Llamas Elvira (UGR and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves and Manuel Gómez Río (Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves).

Early Diagnosis Is Essential

The high mortality rate among patients with gall bladder cancer depends heavily on the lack of clinical data enabling early diagnosis of this type of tumors. This fact determines the survival of this type of patients. At the moment of establishing a diagnosis, an accurate staging will allow to chose the most appropriate treatment, as well as to optimize the use of the resources available. Imaging diagnosis of this pathology is essentially based on morphological techniques (echography, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging).

This new imaging diagnosis method (tomography made by emission of positrons with 18F fluorodeoxyglucose) shows glucose metabolism in tissues. While the utility of this method has been proved in other types of tumors, its utility in gall bladder cancer had not been proved yet.

According to Granada University researchers, their study proves that positron emission tomography scanning wih FDG "is a valid and accurate method for precise staging of patients with suspected gall bladder cancer, which allows to determine the appropriate therapy and treatment, and to optimize the use of the resources available." Thus, they suggest that "each patient with suspected cancer should be subjected to this type of imaging diagnosis, to determine the nature of such process."

The results obtained from this study were partially published in the American Journal of Surgery (2004), the Journal of Surgical Oncology (2006) and the Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear (2009) [Spanish Journal of Nuclear Medicine].


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Granada. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Granada. "New method for accurate diagnosis of gall bladder cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101014083347.htm>.
University of Granada. (2010, October 14). New method for accurate diagnosis of gall bladder cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101014083347.htm
University of Granada. "New method for accurate diagnosis of gall bladder cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101014083347.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins