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Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients

Date:
November 19, 2010
Source:
Colorado State University
Summary:
In the last 50 years, modern medicine has made astounding advances in surgery, yet many of today's veterinary and human medicine students still hone basic surgical and suturing skills on carpet pads and pig's feet before transitioning to a live patient. An invention by veterinarians provides students with artificial body parts that look, feel, behave, and even bleed just like real skin, muscles and vessels, bridging the gap between classroom lectures and procedures on real human or animal patients.

In the last 50 years, modern medicine has made astounding advances in surgery, yet many of today's veterinary and human medicine students still hone basic surgical and suturing skills on carpet pads and pig's feet before transitioning to a live patient. An invention by Colorado State University veterinarians provides students with artificial body parts that look, feel, behave, and even bleed just like real skin, muscles and vessels.

The artificial replicas of sections of human and animal bodies -- such as an abdominal wall -- give students a realistic learning environment that will bridge the gap between classroom lectures and procedures such as surgical cuts and sutures on real human or animal patients.

"It is a significant, stressful leap for medical and veterinary students from the classroom to the surgery suite," said Dr. Dean Hendrickson, a veterinarian and director of CSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital and one of the inventors. "Industry standards for training sometimes actually teach incorrect techniques, or skills that don't translate into real-world situations, so students don't have the ability to realistically prepare for surgery before a live patient. These artificial simulations help students master their technique, dexterity and confidence before they operate for the first time on a person or someone's pet."

The artificial tissues consist of layers of silicone that closely simulate skin, connective tissue and muscle. Built into the silicone are realistically placed and sized "blood vessels" that are connected to an artificial blood source that supplies the tissue with realistic bleeding. For example, students practicing sutures will experience blood coming into a wound or incision from both sides of the tissue at realistic locations and rates.

Some models are colored realistically, such as a brown-skinned abdominal wall of a horse, with white layers and red layers representing muscles and tissues. However, students also may use simulated tissue in translucent material so they can better view and understand, for example, suture patterns from a three-dimensional perspective while learning correct stitches.

"Our hope is that, with this model, we can begin to help students build better skills that will make for better outcomes," said Dr. Fausto Bellezzo, a co-creator of the technology with Hendrickson. Bellezzo is also a veterinarian and researcher at CSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

The creators are working with CSU Ventures to identify investors and partners to advance development of the model for teaching animal and human medicine. CSU Ventures is a subsidiary corporation of the Colorado State University Research Foundation, a private, non-profit foundation that helps the university move technologies from the university into the commercial sector. The foundation has filed a provisional patent for the technology.

Colorado State University's Animal Teaching Hospital is part of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

A video illustrating this model is available on CSU's YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILV-tI1hdA8.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Colorado State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Colorado State University. "Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119120849.htm>.
Colorado State University. (2010, November 19). Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119120849.htm
Colorado State University. "Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101119120849.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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