Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Improvement needed for mastectomy outcome reporting

Date:
December 3, 2010
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Improved standards for outcome reporting in breast reconstruction are needed, according to a new review. Every year in the United States up to 40% of women with breast cancer undergo a mastectomy. They say the most valuable factor in their decision-making is information from health professionals. However, that information is largely dependent on the quality, reporting, and interpretation of research data on surgical procedures.

Improved standards for outcome reporting in breast reconstruction are needed, according to a review published online December 3rd in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Every year in the United States up to 40% of women with breast cancer undergo a mastectomy. They say the most valuable factor in their decision-making is information from health professionals. However, that information is largely dependent on the quality, reporting, and interpretation of research data on surgical procedures.

To summarize the reporting standards of surgical outcomes in breast reconstruction, Shelley Potter, M.D., of the University of Bristol, and colleagues, reviewed 134 studies reporting surgical outcomes of breast reconstruction involving over 42,000 women. Over half of the studies, or 55%, were cohort studies, 36.6% were case series studies, and 8.2% were randomized controlled trials. Specifically, the researchers looked at prospective or retrospective accrual of data, duration of follow-up, proportion of complications, reporting of total and procedure-specific complications, severity of complications, length of hospital stay and adjustment for risk factors such as smoking or radiotherapy.

The researchers found an overall dearth of reporting and inconsistency in the data regarding outcomes of breast reconstruction. The studies defined clearly fewer than 20% of the complications they reported, and only half the studies considered risk factors for adverse outcomes. The authors write, "Details such as the severity of complications (41.8% of all studies), duration of follow-up (58.2%) and overall complication rates (59.7%) were often omitted." Furthermore, many studies had important methodological problems.

The authors write that their review has indicated the need for a standardized approach to outcome assessment in breast reconstruction that also includes non-clinical factors. They write, "Traditional clinical outcomes remain important, but patient-reported outcomes such as satisfaction, body image, functional results, and cosmetic outcome will also need to be incorporated if the outcomes selected are to be of value to the women making decisions about reconstruction."

In an accompanying editorial, Monica Morrow, M.D., and Andrea L. Pusic, M.D., of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, write that the review points to the need for improved outcome reporting as scientists continue to search for therapies. The editorialists write, "In contrast to the search for new breast cancer therapies to improve survival, a long-term and enormously expensive task, improved standards for outcome reporting for reconstruction, and other aspects of breast cancer treatment have the potential to improve patient quality of life in the short term at a relatively modest cost."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Improvement needed for mastectomy outcome reporting." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101203163042.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2010, December 3). Improvement needed for mastectomy outcome reporting. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101203163042.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Improvement needed for mastectomy outcome reporting." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101203163042.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins