Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nanoparticle vaccine protects against stomach flu

Date:
January 20, 2011
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
A new vaccine strategy using nanoparticles as carriers may be the key to developing a vaccine against norovirus, one of the most common causes of foodborne disease in the United States.

A new vaccine strategy using nanoparticles as carriers may be the key to developing a vaccine against norovirus, one of the most common causes of foodborne disease in the United States. Researchers from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report promising findings in the January 2011 issue of the Journal of Virology.

Related Articles


The application of nanoparticles as carriers to present small peptide antigens is a growing field within vaccine development. Researchers led by Xi Jason Jiang of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, have described a new nanocarrier, called a P particle, which holds promise as a scaffold for a variety of vaccines. In the current study they inserted rotavirus antigen into the P particle, which boosted immune response to rotavirus, as well as norovirus, in mice.

Both rotavirus and norovirus are important causes of acute gastroenteritis. The former causes severe diarrhea in children, and kills an estimated 527,000 worldwide, annually. Norovirus is a notably highly transmissible, and particularly unpleasant flu, which can result in one to three days of vomiting and diarrhea in otherwise healthy adults, and which kills 200,000 children annually.

"The dual vaccine holds promise for controlling gastroenteritis in children," says Jiang.

The P particle's unique feature is the scaffold. The P particle consists of 24 copies of an outer coat protein from norovirus. The beauty of the P particle is that it contains three types of surface loops, which are ideal for presenting a wide variety of antigens. Additionally, it is highly immunogenic and extremely stable, the latter an important quality for use in developing nations. The antigens can easily be inserted during the manufacturing process. Production is a simple matter of expressing the cloned P particle in E. coli.

In addition to the rotavirus antigen, the team has succeeded in inserting a number of antigens into the P particle, varying in size up to more than 200 amino acids. The resulting vaccines have induced significantly stronger immune responses in mice than have free antigens.

Jiang is principal investigator for a five year, $4.1 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Disease (NIAID) that Cincinnati Children's received last May to develop the P particle vaccine against norovirus. "With the unique features of high efficiency, easy production, and low cost, this new platform will find a broad application in the biomedical sciences," says Jiang.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Tan, P. Huang, M. Xia, P.-A. Fang, W. Zhong, M. McNeal, C. Wei, W. Jiang, X. Jiang. Norovirus P Particle, a Novel Platform for Vaccine Development and Antibody Production. Journal of Virology, 2010; 85 (2): 753 DOI: 10.1128/JVI.01835-10

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Nanoparticle vaccine protects against stomach flu." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119191230.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2011, January 20). Nanoparticle vaccine protects against stomach flu. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119191230.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Nanoparticle vaccine protects against stomach flu." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119191230.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Indiana Permits Needle Exchange as HIV Cases Skyrocket

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 26, 2015) Governor Mike Pence declares the recent HIV outbreak in rural Indiana a "public health emergency" and authorizes a short-term needle-exchange program. Rough Cut (no reporter narration) Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AAA: Distracted Driving a Serious Teen Problem

AP (Mar. 25, 2015) While distracted driving is not a new problem for teens, new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says it&apos;s much more serious than previously thought. (March 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins