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Low-cost, nanometer-sized drug holds promise for treatment of chronic diabetes and burn wounds

Date:
February 7, 2011
Source:
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Summary:
A low cost, nanometer-sized drug to treat chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers or burns, has been developed by a group of scientists from Israel, the U.S. and Japan.

Dr. Yaakov Nahmias is head of the Center for Bioengineering in the Service of Humanity at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Credit: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

A low cost, nanometer-sizeddrug to treat chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers or burns, has been developed by a group of scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Harvard Medical School and others in the U.S. and Japan.

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Diabetes is a rapidly growing medical problem affecting close to 3 percent of the world’s population. Poor blood circulation arising from diabetes often results in skin wounds which do not heal, causing pain, infection and at times amputation of limbs.

Several proteins,called growth factors, have been found to speed up the healing process, however purifyingthese growth factor proteins is veryexpensive, and they do not last long on the injured site.

Now, scientists at the Hebrew University and Harvard involved in the project have used genetic engineering to produce a “robotic” growth factor protein that responds to temperature.Increasingthe temperature causes dozens of these proteins to fold together into a nanoparticle that is more than 200 times smaller than a single hair.

This behaviorgreatly simplifies protein purification, making it very inexpensive to produce. It also enablesthe growth factor to be confined and to remain at theburn or wound site.The scientists refer to their discovery as robotic, since just as robots are machines that respond to their environment by carrying out a specific activity, so too this protein they have developed responds and reacts to heat.

The experimental drug, which ha been developed by the research group as a topical ointment, has been patented and thus far has been used to treat chronic wounds in diabetic mice, dramatically increasing the healing rate. The goal is to proceed to human clinical trials at some future date after future tests and refinements.

An article on the project has been published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The authors are Dr. Yaakov Nahmias, director of the Center for Bioengineering in the Service of Humanity at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Dr. Zaki Megeed, Prof. Robert Sheridan and Prof. Martin L. Yarmush of the Harvard Medical School and Shriners Hospitals for Children; Prof. Piyush Koria of the University of South Florida; and Dr. Hiroshi Yagi and Dr. Yuko Kitagawa of the Keio University School of Medicine in Japan.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. Koria, H. Yagi, Y. Kitagawa, Z. Megeed, Y. Nahmias, R. Sheridan, M. L. Yarmush. Self-assembling elastin-like peptides growth factor chimeric nanoparticles for the treatment of chronic wounds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2010; 108 (3): 1034 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1009881108

Cite This Page:

Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "Low-cost, nanometer-sized drug holds promise for treatment of chronic diabetes and burn wounds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207084325.htm>.
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. (2011, February 7). Low-cost, nanometer-sized drug holds promise for treatment of chronic diabetes and burn wounds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207084325.htm
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "Low-cost, nanometer-sized drug holds promise for treatment of chronic diabetes and burn wounds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207084325.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

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