Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Use of interactive digital exercise games by children can result in high level of energy expenditure

Date:
March 7, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Middle school-aged children who participated in interactive digital gaming activities that feature player movement (exergaming), such as dancing or boxing, increased their energy expenditure to a level of moderate or vigorous intensity, according to a new article.

Middle school-aged children who participated in interactive digital gaming activities that feature player movement (exergaming), such as dancing or boxing, increased their energy expenditure to a level of moderate or vigorous intensity, according to a report posted online March 7 that will appear in the July print issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

"The prevalence of overweight children and adolescents has increased drastically over the past several decades. This increase is troubling given the potentially numerous adverse health implications," according to background information in the article. The positive and prevailing relationship between obesity and sedentary behavior among children has been well documented, with a common sedentary behavior being screen time, which includes activities such as watching television or videos, using a computer, surfing the Internet, and playing video games. There has recently been increased interest in activity-promoting video gaming or video games that require physical movement and feature player movement such as would occur in "real-life" exercise participation.

"Active video games have the potential to increase energy expenditure during otherwise sedentary video gaming and may provide a viable adjunct to more traditional exercise," the authors write. "The potential of these games to promote fitness and extended periods of moderate to vigorous activity in normal and overweight youth has not been evaluated."

Bruce W. Bailey, Ph.D., of Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, and Kyle McInnis, Sc.D., of the University of Massachusetts, Boston, conducted a study to evaluate the potential effect of 6 forms of exergaming (3 commercial products and 3 consumer products) on energy expenditure in children of various body mass indexes (BMIs). The study included 39 boys and girls (average age, 11.5 years). In addition to treadmill walking at 3 miles per hour, energy expenditure of the following exergames were assessed for 10 minutes: Dance Dance Revolution, LightSpace (Bug Invasion), Nintendo Wii (Boxing), Cybex Trazer (Goalie Wars), Sportwall, and Xavix (J-Mat). Participants were given 5 minutes of seated rest between each activity.

The researchers found that all forms of interactive gaming evaluated in the study significantly increased energy expenditure above rest, with no between-group differences among normal (BMI less than 85th percentile) and "at-risk" or overweight (BMI 85th percentile or greater) children. Walking at 3 miles per hour resulted in an average metabolic equivalent task value (determined by dividing relative energy expenditure for each activity by a certain figure) of 4.9, whereas the intensity of exergaming resulted in an average metabolic equivalent task values of 4.2 for Wii, 5.4 for Dance Dance Revolution, 6.4 for LightSpace, 7.0 for Xavix, 5.9 for Cybex Trazer, and 7.1 for Sportwall. The researchers note that this level of intensity is consistent with current physical activity recommendations for children.

Enjoyment of the games was generally high, but overall, children at risk of becoming overweight or who were overweight enjoyed the exergames to a greater extent than did children with a BMI below the 85th percentile.

"Although exergaming is most likely not the solution to the epidemic of reduced physical activity in children, it appears to be a potentially innovative strategy that can be used to reduce sedentary time, increase adherence to exercise programs, and promote enjoyment of physical activity. This may be especially important for at-risk populations, specifically children who carry excess body weight. Future research should longitudinally evaluate the impact of exergaming on physical activity patterns in youth. In addition, more research is needed to evaluate how prolonged participation in exergaming alters energy balance and adiposity," the authors conclude.

This project was funded by a Healey Grant from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Editorial: Potential vs. Actual Benefits of Exergames

"Now that we know exergames can spur high-intensity physical activity, a key research topic is to directly compare exergames to other physical-activity options," writes James F. Sallis, Ph.D., of San Diego State University, in an accompanying editorial.

"The main outcomes of interest are total physical activity and energy expenditure during weeks and months. Other research topics are how to promote extensive long-term use of exergames, how to integrate exergaming within comprehensive physical-activity promotion efforts, and how to make effective exergames accessible to economically disadvantaged adolescents who have limited access to other physical-activity options."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Bruce W. Bailey and Kyle McInnis. Energy Cost of Exergaming A Comparison of the Energy Cost of 6 Forms of Exergaming. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med., March 7, 2011 DOI: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.15

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Use of interactive digital exercise games by children can result in high level of energy expenditure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307161857.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, March 7). Use of interactive digital exercise games by children can result in high level of energy expenditure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307161857.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Use of interactive digital exercise games by children can result in high level of energy expenditure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307161857.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC says a new case of Ebola has not been reported in Nigeria for more than 21 days, leading to hopes the outbreak might be nearing its end. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) The newly appointed head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Anthony Banbury, outlines operations to tackle the virus. Duration: 00:39 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC has confirmed the first diagnosed case of Ebola in the United States. The patient is being treated at a Dallas hospital after traveling earlier this month from Liberia. (Sept. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) In a clinical trial, breast cancer patients lived an average of 15 months longer when they received new drug Perjeta along with Herceptin. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins