Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Noninvasive extenders are better than surgery for men who want a longer penis, study finds

Date:
April 18, 2011
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Surgeons should encourage men who request penile lengthening surgery to try non-invasive methods first and, in some cases, consider therapy to help them feel more positive about their body. Urologists compared 11 evidence-based studies covering 230 men between 2000 and 2009. They found that surgical techniques resulted in average flaccid size increases of between 1.3 cm and 2.5 cm and three types of penile extenders resulted in average flaccid increases of 0.5 cm to 2.3 cm.

Surgeons should encourage men who request penile lengthening surgery to try non-invasive methods first and, in some cases, consider therapy to help them feel more positive about their body.

An Italian review published in the April issue of the urology journal BJUI found that penile extenders are more successful than techniques like vacuum devices, exercises and botox injections and that psychological satisfaction is often just as important as physical changes.

"Urologists are constantly approached by men who are concerned about the size of their penis, despite the fact that the majority of them are normal sized" says Associate urology Professor Paolo Gontero, from the University of Turin, who carried out the research review with Dr Marco Oderda.

"However there are also a number of medical and surgical conditions that can cause penile shortening, such as radical prostatectomy for men with prostate cancer, Peyronie's disease and congenital abnormalities. Then there's 'hidden penis', which is caused by overlying abdominal fat and skin in obese aging men or a lack of skin because of chronic inflammation or an aggressive circumcision.

"Surgery is characterised by a risk of complications and unwanted outcomes and lack of consensus among the medical profession on the indications for surgery and the techniques used. That is why a non-invasive technique is preferable."

The review compared five evidence-based surgical studies covering 121 men and six evidence-based non-surgical studies covering 109 men, published between 2000 and 2009. Key findings included:

  • The average age of the men included in the studies ranged from 24 to 56 and the average follow-up ranged from three to 16 months.
  • Surgical techniques resulted in average flaccid size increases of between 1.3cm and 2.5cm. One report mentioned a highly invasive surgical procedure that achieved up to 4cm, but the authors could find no reports to suggest this has been reproduced by others. Meanwhile, studies of three types of penile extenders resulted in average flaccid increases of 0.5cm to 2.3cm.
  • The most common surgical technique -- used on 83 per cent of patients -- was dissection of the suspensory ligament, carried out on men with underdeveloped penises, Peyronie's disease, very small penises (micropenis), penile carcinoma or trauma. A number of patients had surgery because of dysmorphophobia, a psychological dislike of their body.
  • Nineteen men with an erect penis length of 6-10cm received the invasive surgery that involved penile disassembly with autologous cartilage and five of those experienced moderate dorsal penile curvature after surgery. The authors foresee a high complication and dissatisfaction rate with this surgical technique.
  • A total of 72 men used the penile extenders. Six reported minor problems, with three experiencing bruising and one each reporting temporary discolouration, pain and itching.
  • A study on the long-term effects of repeated vacuum treatment showed no significant physical change after six months of therapy, but it did provide a degree of psychological satisfaction for some men. Two of the 37 men experienced side effects, with one haematoma (blood under the tissue) and one case of numbness recorded.

Further research showed that:

  • One study showed that botox may have a temporary effect in decreasing penile retraction and improving flaccid length.
  • Another suggested that penoscrotal rings could help augment penile size and maintain erections in men suffering from anxiety if combined with a PDE5 inhibitor (erectile dysfunction drug). However, the authors could only find two case reports that described the efficacy of these devices.
  • There is no scientific evidence to show that penile lengthening exercises work. Despite this, it is very attractive to patients who like the idea of a non-invasive, low-cost method of penis enlargement and is widely discussed on the internet.
  • Many men feel that their penis is too small when, in fact, very few seeking help have a micropenis. This suggests that therapy could play an important role in helping men to address their concerns.

"No studies have been carried out to compare surgical and non-invasive methods of penile lengthening" says Professor Gontero. "However our review suggests that penile extenders represent an effective and durable method of penile lengthening, capable of elongating the penis by an average of 1.8cm with minimal side effects. This compares favourably with surgery, which is much more invasive for the patient.

"Based on current evidence, we suggest that penile extenders, not surgery, should be the first-line treatment for men seeking a penile lengthening procedure.

"Cognitive behavioural therapy can also be useful in building men's confidence if they have body image issues."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marco Oderda, Paolo Gontero. Non-invasive methods of penile lengthening: fact or fiction? BJU International, 2011; 107 (8): 1278 DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2010.09647.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Noninvasive extenders are better than surgery for men who want a longer penis, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418093842.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2011, April 18). Noninvasive extenders are better than surgery for men who want a longer penis, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418093842.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Noninvasive extenders are better than surgery for men who want a longer penis, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418093842.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Here are three things you need to know about the deadly Ebola outbreak's progression this week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins