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Full 3-D invisibility cloak in visible light

Date:
April 27, 2011
Source:
Optical Society of America
Summary:
Watching things disappear is an amazing experience. But making items vanish is not the reason scientists work to create invisibility cloaks. Rather, the magic-like tricks are attractive demonstrations of the fantastic capabilities that new optical theories and nanotechnology construction methods now enable.

Abstract red light. Researchers have developed a three-dimensional invisibility cloak that works for visible light -- red light at a wavelength of 700 nm -- independent of its polarization (orientation).
Credit: Kim D. French / Fotolia

Watching things disappear "is an amazing experience," admits Joachim Fischer of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. But making items vanish is not the reason he creates invisibility cloaks. Rather, the magic-like tricks are attractive demonstrations of the fantastic capabilities that new optical theories and nanotechnology construction methods now enable.

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This new area, called "transformation optics," as the item just above also showed, has turned modern optical design on its ear by showing how to manipulate light in ways long thought to be impossible. They promise to improve dramatically such light-based technologies as microscopes, lenses, chip manufacturing and data communications.

In his CLEO: 2011 talk , Fischer will describe the first-ever demonstration of a three-dimensional invisibility cloak that works for visible light -- red light at a wavelength of 700 nm -- independent of its polarization (orientation). Previous cloaks required longer wavelength light, such as microwaves or infrared, or required the light to have a single, specific polarization.

Fischer makes the tiny cloak -- less than half the cross-section of a human-hair -- by direct laser writing (i.e. lithography) into a polymer material to create an intricate structure that resembles a miniature woodpile. The precisely varying thickness of the "logs" enables the cloak to bend light in new ways. The key to this achievement was incorporating several aspects of a diffraction-unlimited microscopy technique into the team's 3-D direct writing process for building the cloak. The dramatically increased resolution of the improved process enabled the team to create log spacings narrow enough to work in red light.

"If, in the future, we can halve again the log spacing of this red cloak, we could make one that would cover the entire visible spectrum," Fischer added.

Practical applications of combining transformation optics with advanced 3-D lithography (a customized version of the fabrication steps used to make microcircuits) include flat, aberration-free lenses that can be easily miniaturized for use in integrated optical chips, and optical "black holes" for concentrating and absorbing light. If the latter can also be made to work for visible light, they will be useful in solar cells, since 90 percent of the Sun's energy reaches Earth as visible and near-infrared light.

This research will be presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO: 2011), May 1 -- 6 at the Baltimore Convention Center.

Presentation QTuG5 "Three-dimensional invisibility carpet cloak at 700 nm wavelength," by Joachim Fischer et al. is on May 3. Fischer et al. will also present CML1, "Three-Dimensional Laser Lithography with Conceptually Diffraction-Unlimited Lateral and Axial Resolution," on May 2.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Optical Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Optical Society of America. "Full 3-D invisibility cloak in visible light." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110426111410.htm>.
Optical Society of America. (2011, April 27). Full 3-D invisibility cloak in visible light. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110426111410.htm
Optical Society of America. "Full 3-D invisibility cloak in visible light." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110426111410.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

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