Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Depression associated with poor medication adherence in patients with chronic illnesses

Date:
May 10, 2011
Source:
RAND Corporation
Summary:
People who are depressed are less likely to adhere to medications for their chronic health problems than patients who are not depressed, putting them at increased risk of poor health, according to a new study.

People who are depressed are less likely to adhere to medications for their chronic health problems than patients who are not depressed, putting them at increased risk of poor health, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Researchers found that depressed patients across a wide array of chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease had 76 percent greater odds of being non-adherent with their medications compared to patients who were not depressed. The findings were published online by the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

The study is the largest systematic review to date to look at the role that depression plays in medication adherence among patients in the United States.

"These findings provide the best evidence to date that depression is an important risk factor that may influence whether patients adhere to their medications," said Dr. Walid F. Gellad, the study's senior author and a natural scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. "There are important implications for both patient health and for health care costs.

"Doctors and other providers should periodically ask patients with depression about medication adherence. Also, when treating a patient who is not taking their medication correctly, they should consider the possibility that depression is contributing to the problem."

Poor adherence to prescribed medication is a well-known problem that is associated with higher death rates among people with chronic illnesses. It is also blamed for increasing U.S. health care costs.

Researchers from RAND and the Claremont Graduate School conducted the study by examining past studies that have measured medication adherence. They combined information from 31 studies involving more than 18,000 people -- significantly more than past reviews -to examine the link between medication adherence and depression.

The study is the first to review the association between depression and medication adherence for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Other conditions examined in the study include coronary heart disease, diabetes and asthma. The link between depression and medication adherence did not vary significantly between the different chronic illnesses, said Gellad, who is also a physician with the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System.

"The consistent link between depression and nonadherence across all these illnesses underscores the seriousness of the role that depression plays in keeping people from properly managing chronic conditions," said Jerry L. Grenard, the study's lead author and an assistant professor at the Claremont Graduate School. "That consistency also suggests that lessons learned about how to improve medication adherence among depressed patients with one disease may be applied to other chronic conditions."

Researchers say that depression is just one barrier to getting patients to follow medication recommendations. Additional well-documented barriers to medication adherence are dose complexity and patient cost-sharing. Other barriers that may play a role include beliefs about medications, social support, side effects and provider factors.

The study was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and by Mehlman Vogel Castagnetti.

Other authors of the study are Brett A. Munjas, John L. Adams, Marika Suttorp and Margaret Maglione of RAND, and Elizabeth A. McGlynn of Kaiser Permanente.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by RAND Corporation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jerry L. Grenard, Brett A. Munjas, John L. Adams, Marika Suttorp, Margaret Maglione, Elizabeth A. McGlynn, Walid F. Gellad. Depression and Medication Adherence in the Treatment of Chronic Diseases in the United States: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2011; DOI: 10.1007/s11606-011-1704-y

Cite This Page:

RAND Corporation. "Depression associated with poor medication adherence in patients with chronic illnesses." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110510121409.htm>.
RAND Corporation. (2011, May 10). Depression associated with poor medication adherence in patients with chronic illnesses. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110510121409.htm
RAND Corporation. "Depression associated with poor medication adherence in patients with chronic illnesses." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110510121409.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Electrical Stimulation Boosts Brain Function, Study Says

Electrical Stimulation Boosts Brain Function, Study Says

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Researchers found an improvement in memory and learning function in subjects who received electric pulses to their brains. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins