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The quantum computer is growing up: Repetitive error correction in a quantum processor

Date:
May 26, 2011
Source:
University of Innsbruck
Summary:
Physicists have demonstrated a crucial element for a future functioning quantum computer: repetitive error correction. This allows scientists to correct errors occurring in a quantum computer efficiently.

The quantum bit (blue) is entangled with the auxiliary qubits (red). If an error occurs, the state of the defective quantum bit is corrected.
Credit: Harald Ritsch

Physicists have demonstrated a crucial element for a future functioning quantum computer: repetitive error correction. This allows scientists to correct errors occurring in a quantum computer efficiently.

A general rule in data processing is that disturbances cause the distortion or deletion of information during data storage or transfer. Methods for conventional computers were developed that automatically identify and correct errors: Data are processed several times and if errors occur, the most likely correct option is chosen. As quantum systems are even more sensitive to environmental disturbances than classical systems, a quantum computer requires a highly efficient algorithm for error correction. The research group of Rainer Blatt from the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Innsbruck and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IQOQI) has now demonstrated such an algorithm experimentally.

"The difficulty arises because quantum information cannot be copied," explains Schindler. "This means that we cannot save information repeatedly and then compare it." Therefore, the physicists use one of the peculiarities of quantum physics and use quantum mechanical entanglement to perform error correction.

Quick and efficient error correction

The Innsbruck physicists demonstrate the mechanism by storing three calcium ions in an ion trap. All three particles are used as quantum bits (qubits), where one ion represents the system qubit and the other two ions auxiliary qubits. "First we entangle the system qubit with the other qubits, which transfers the quantum information to all three particles," says Philipp Schindler. "Then a quantum algorithm determines whether an error occurs and if so, which one. Subsequently, the algorithm itself corrects the error." After having made the correction, the auxiliary qubits are reset using a laser beam. "This last point is the new element in our experiment, which enables repetitive error correction," says Rainer Blatt. "Some years ago, American colleagues demonstrated the general functioning of quantum error correction. Our new mechanism allows us to repeatedly and efficiently correct errors."

Leading the field

"For a quantum computer to become reality, we need a quantum processor with many quantum bits," explains Schindler. "Moreover, we need quantum operations that work nearly error-free. The third crucial element is an efficient error correction." For many years Rainer Blatt's research group, which is one of the global leaders in the field, has been working on realizing a quantum computer. Three years ago they presented the first quantum gate with fidelity of more than 99 percent. Now they have realized another key element: repetitive error correction.

This research work is supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), the European Commission, the European Research Council and the Federation of Austrian Industries Tyrol and is published in the scientific journal Science.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Innsbruck. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Philipp Schindler, Julio T. Barreiro, Thomas Monz, Volckmar Nebendahl, Daniel Nigg, Michael Chwalla, Markus Hennrich, and Rainer Blatt. Experimental Repetitive Quantum Error Correction. Science, 27 May 2011: Vol. 332 no. 6033 pp. 1059-1061 DOI: 10.1126/science.1203329

Cite This Page:

University of Innsbruck. "The quantum computer is growing up: Repetitive error correction in a quantum processor." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526141501.htm>.
University of Innsbruck. (2011, May 26). The quantum computer is growing up: Repetitive error correction in a quantum processor. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526141501.htm
University of Innsbruck. "The quantum computer is growing up: Repetitive error correction in a quantum processor." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526141501.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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