Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Combination antibody therapy shows promise in metastatic melanoma

Date:
June 5, 2011
Source:
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Summary:
A duo of monoclonal antibodies -- ipilimumab and bevacizumab -- each targeting a prime survival strategy of tumors, can be safely administered and are potentially more effective than either drug alone for advanced, inoperable melanomas, according to a phase 1 clinical trial.

A duo of drugs, each targeting a prime survival strategy of tumors, can be safely administered and are potentially more effective than either drug alone for advanced, inoperable melanomas, according to a phase 1 clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators.

The findings are being presented in an oral session at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

The drugs -- ipilimumab and bevacizumab -- are both monoclonal antibodies, intensified formulations of natural disease-fighting proteins. Ipilimumab spurs the immune system to attack diseased cells, including tumor cells. Bevacizumab, also known by the trade name Avastin, blocks the growth of blood vessels that provide tumors with nourishment. Ipilimumab has extended the lives of metastatic melanoma patients in previous clinical trials, and bevacizumab is often used to treat tumors of the colon, lung, and kidney.

The trial involved 22 patients with metatastic melanoma that was not treatable by surgery.

F. Stephen Hodi, MD, the study's lead author and director of the melanoma treatment center at Dana-Farber, said the trial is the first to explore whether the two agents enhance each other's effectiveness. Most of the participants didn't experience serious adverse side effects, although some did experience inflammation of artery walls, the liver, thyroid gland, colon, or uvea (the middle layer of the eye). Five patients required steroid treatment for these problems and were removed the trial.

Positron emission tomography (PET) scans showed a prompt immune system response to many of the melanoma tumors, and computed tomography (CT) scans showed decreased blood flow to the tumors. Eight of the participants had partial responses -- showing some tumor shrinkage -- to the dual treatment, and six had stable disease. All the responses lasted at least six months. Biopsies performed after the treatment showed a more vigorous immune system response than would be expected with ipilimumab alone.

"Our findings indicate that ipilimumab and bevacizumab can be safely administered with careful management of side effects," said Hodi. "The results of lab tests suggest that the two agents may work synergistically, with 14 of 21 evaluable patients experiencing a clinical benefit. This approach merits exploration in further clinical trials."

Funding for the trial was provided by grants from the Melanoma Research Alliance and National Institutes of Health.

The other co-authors of the study are Philip Friedlander, MD, Annick Van Den Abbeele, MD, Nageatte Ibrahim, MD, Xinqi Wu, PhD, Jun Zhou, PhD, Anita Giobbie-Hurder, Travis Hollmann, MD, PhD, Sara Russell, MD, Pamela Dipiro, MD, Jeffrey Yap, PhD, Dana-Farber; George Murphy, MD, David McDermott, MD, Brigham and Women's Hospital; Michael Atkins, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; and Donald Lawrence, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "Combination antibody therapy shows promise in metastatic melanoma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110603171108.htm>.
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (2011, June 5). Combination antibody therapy shows promise in metastatic melanoma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110603171108.htm
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "Combination antibody therapy shows promise in metastatic melanoma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110603171108.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins