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Fidgeting your way to fitness

Date:
June 30, 2011
Source:
Queen's University
Summary:
Walking to the photocopier and fidgeting at your desk are contributing more to your cardiorespiratory fitness than you might think.

Walking to the photocopier and fidgeting at your desk are contributing more to your cardiorespiratory fitness than you might think.
Credit: Monkey Business / Fotolia

Walking to the photocopier and fidgeting at your desk are contributing more to your cardiorespiratory fitness than you might think.

Researchers have found that both the duration and intensity of incidental physical activities (IPA) are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness. The intensity of the activity seems to be particularly important, with a cumulative 30-minute increase in moderate physical activity throughout the day offering significant benefits for fitness and long-term health.

"It's encouraging to know that if we just increase our incidental activity slightly--a little bit more work around the house, or walking down the hall to speak with a co-worker as opposed to sending an email--we can really benefit our health in the long-term," says Ashlee McGuire, the study's lead researcher and a graduate student in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies. "Best of all, these activities don't take up a lot of time, they're not difficult to do, and you don't have to go to a gym."

Ms McGuire and fellow researcher Robert Ross, a professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, define IPA as non-purposeful physical activity accrued through activities of daily living, such as doing housework, climbing stairs or walking around the office.

Since a large proportion of the Canadian population doesn't participate in a more structured, higher intensity exercise regime, Ms McGuire and Dr. Ross wanted to find out whether the time and intensity of incidental physical activity had any impact on cardiorespiratory fitness.

None of the study's participants met Canada's physical activity guidelines and were engaging solely in incidental physical activity. Activity levels were gauged using an accelerometer, which measures the duration and intensity of movement. Participants wore the accelerometer for a week and also took part in a test to measure their cardiorespiratory fitness.

These findings were recently published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. Ashlee McGuire, Robert Ross. Incidental Physical Activity Is Positively Associated With Cardiorespiratory Fitness. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 2011; 1 DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31821e4ff2

Cite This Page:

Queen's University. "Fidgeting your way to fitness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110628113141.htm>.
Queen's University. (2011, June 30). Fidgeting your way to fitness. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110628113141.htm
Queen's University. "Fidgeting your way to fitness." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110628113141.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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